Cover image for Diary of a wombat
Title:
Diary of a wombat
Author:
French, Jackie.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Clarion Books, 2003.

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 22 x 29 cm
Summary:
In his diary, a wombat describes his life of eating, sleeping, and getting to know some new human neighbors.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
170 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.5 0.5 70892.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.2 2 Quiz: 35042 Guided reading level: J.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780618381364
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Wombats are cuddly-looking, slow-moving Australian animals. Their favorite activities are eating, sleeping, and digging holes. Here, in the words of one unusually articulate wombat, is the tongue-in-cheek account of a busy week; eating, sleeping, digging holes . . . and training its new neighbors, a family of humans, to produce treats on demand. This entertaining book, with its brief, humorous text and hilarious illustrations, will endear the wombat to young children, who may recognize in the determined furry creature some qualities that they share.


Author Notes

Jackie French was born on November 29, 1953 in Sydney, Australia. She overcame dyslexia to write over 140 books for both children and adults. Her children's books include Diary of a Wombat, Christmas Wombat, Flood, and Fire. A Waltz for Matilda, published in 2016, won the Kids Reading Oz Choice (KROC) Award for fiction for years 7-9. She has also written 6 gardening books. She has received numerous awards including the 2000 CBCA Book of the Year for Younger Readers and the UK Wow! Award for Hitler's Daughter, an Aurealis Award for Cafe on Callisto, and ACT Book of the Year for In the Blood. She was chosen to be the Australian National Children's Laureate for 2014-2015 and was named the 2015 Senior Australian of the Year. She also won a 2015 Excellence Award and the Redmond Barry Award, which honors contributions to the library and information sector. In 2016, she and illustrator Peter Bray won the ACT Writing and Publishing Award in the children's book category for their book, Horace the Baker's Horse and she was given the Pixie O'Harris Award for service to Australian children's books given by the Australian Book Industry Awards.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

What, exactly, do wombats do all day? One enterprising wombat answers that question and a few others in diary form in French's (No Such Thing) tongue-in-cheek picture book. After explaining his unique Australian heritage, the star of this volume paints a funny, if rather dull, picture of his daily routine. "Monday Morning: Slept./ Afternoon: Slept./ Evening: Ate grass./ Scratched./ Night: Ate grass." Things begin to perk up, however, when the wombat discovers its new human neighbors. Before long, the always-hungry creature is at their door begging for food (preferably carrots or oats), digging in their garden ("Began new hole in soft dirt") and turning his neighbors' belongings into scratching posts. Happily, the human family appears to take the antics of their adopted wild "pet" in stride (though the wombat sees things a bit differently "Have decided that humans are easily trained and make quite good pets"). Whatley (the Detective Donut books) appears to relish this character study; he paints the chocolate-brown wombat in numerous poses and expressions-rolling, scratching, sleeping, chewing-on an ample white background. The artist gives the star expressive eyes without anthropomorphizing her. The often cuddly looking wombat may leave some readers envious of its languid lifestyle. And those curious about other animals' activities can explore Diary of a Worm (reviewed below). Ages 4-7. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Through simple sentences and hilarious yet realistic acrylic illustrations, readers are treated to a week of observations made by a young female wombat who becomes chummy with a human family. The diarist's obsessions with sleep and carrots allow a rest from heavier chuckles over a confrontation with a welcome mat: "Discovered flat, hairy creature invading my territory. Fought major battle with flat, hairy creature. Won battle. Neighbors should be pleased. Demanded a reward." French's text, in Kid's Stuff Plain font, also indirectly informs on habitat and wombats' nocturnal lifestyle. Whatley gives a sublime balance of the adorable charm of the creature, along with its drawbacks as an acquaintance. This title will team nicely with Margaret Spurling's Bilby Moon (Kane/Miller, 2001) for studies of Australian wildlife.-Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.