Cover image for Crazy Hair Day
Title:
Crazy Hair Day
Author:
Saltzberg, Barney.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, MA : Candlewick Press, 2003.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Stanley is excited about Crazy Hair Day at his school, until he discovers that he has gotten the date wrong.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 560 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.8 0.5 72121.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.9 1 Quiz: 36089 Guided reading level: J.
ISBN:
9780763619541
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"A crackerjack read-aloud with a great finish." --SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL

Stanley Birdbaum couldn't be more excited. He has rolled and wrapped and dyed his hair. He has dipped it and sprayed it and made it, well, perfect. He is ready to celebrate Crazy Hair Day at school. But when Stanley saunters up to the classroom, he learns, to his horror, that Crazy Hair Day is . . . next week. To make matters worse, today is School Picture Day, and everyone is expected to line up for the class photo! What's Stanley to do?


Author Notes

Barney Saltzberg was born in Los Angeles, California. He fell in love with drawing at an early age, encouraged primarily by his mother, who bought him drawing pads instead of coloring books so he could create his own art. Barney went on to study art at Sonoma State College in Northern California.

Barney moved back to Los Angeles in the late 1970's and took a class at Otis/Parsons in children's book writing and illustration. His first published children's book, It Must Have Been the Wind, came out of that class. He now has published close to thirty books.

Saltzberg carries around a sketchbook and is constantly doodling and writing things down. In addition to writing and illustrating children's books he has recorded two albums for children. Where, Oh, Where's My Underwear? and most recently The Soccer Mom From Outer Space! He has also written and produced songs for the PBS show, Arthur.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

K-Gr. 2. For Crazy Hair Day at school, Stanley marches into class with his hair arranged in multicolored spikes, determined to have the craziest hair in the whole school. Unfortunately, poor Stanley has mixed up the dates of Crazy Hair Day and School Picture Day, and he retreats in horror to the bathroom. A friend finally coaxes him back to the class for their group picture, where he discovers everyone modeling sympathy dos. The novelty of spending a school day alone in the bathroom is very truly observed, and adults will appreciate Mr. Winger's deft conversion of one student's catastrophe into an opportunity for class bonding. Saltzberg's characters (hamsters, according to the jacket flap, though they're not recognizable as such) don't express a great range of emotion, but the pictures are bright and appealing, and the authenticity of Stanley's situation is likely to put readers in the mood to share their most embarrassing moments. --Jennifer Mattson Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Stanley Birdbaum has committed perhaps the worst possible kid faux pas: he has worn a wacky hairstyle to school for Crazy Hair Day-on the wrong day. In fact, it's actually Class Picture Day. Granted, Stanley's 'do has been expertly executed by Stanley's mom: "She wrapped. She dipped. And to make his hair perfect, she sprayed Stanley's hair bright orange and blue. `Ta-da!' said Stanley. `I am a work of art!' " But his pride vaporizes when Stanley discovers his error, and he takes refuge in the boys' bathroom, resolving to be a no-show for the class photo. Saltzberg (Soccer Mom from Outer Space) portrays the characters as roly-poly hedgehog-like critters, but the school setting and social milieu are authentically and poignantly human. He understands how kids revel in the ostensible rule-breaking and goofy creativity of "Spirit Days" ("Stanley rolled the rubber bands in his hair. He gently tapped the tops of his spikes" before entering the classroom), and also how life at the elementary level takes no prisoners-even Stanley's best friend Larry scores a quip at his expense ("Is that a hair-do or a hair-don't?"). The story begins to sink under the weight of empathy as the coif-challenged hero slowly works through his embarrassment (with an assist from the now conciliatory Larry). But the wrap-up offers Stanley the perfect hair tonic: the entire class welcomes him to the class picture with their own hastily improvised but undisputedly zany headdress. Ages 5-8. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-A crackerjack read-aloud with a great finish. Stanley is ready for Crazy Hair Day at school. He gets up early, his mother helps him create a spiky tricolored wonder, and off he goes to discover that Crazy Hair Day is the following Friday and today is School Picture Day. After his friend Larry teases him, an embarrassed Stanley hides in the bathroom. Larry tries to talk him out in time for the picture but Stanley is afraid he'll "look like the class weirdo." Once he realizes that he wants to be in the photo, he returns to the classroom, only to find everyone with a crazy hairdo. The pencil, ink, and acrylic illustrations support the text beautifully. Although their species is not clear, the animal characters resemble aardvarkian Arthur. This delightful tale of confusion and compassion is just the ticket to prepare for special days or defuse potential teasing if someone should arrive in the right getup on the wrong day.-Jody McCoy, The Bush School, Seattle, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.