Cover image for Transformations
Title:
Transformations
Author:
Sexton, Anne.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2001.

©1971
Physical Description:
ix, 112 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
General Note:
"A Mariner book".
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780618083435
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3537.E915 T7C Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PS3537.E915 T7C Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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On Order

Summary

Summary

These poem-stories are a strange retelling of seventeen Grimms fairy tales, including "Snow White," "Rumpelstiltskin," "Rapunzel," "The Twelve Dancing Princesses," "The Frog Prince," and "Red Riding Hood." Astonishingly, they are as wholly personal as Anne Sexton's most intimate poems. "Her metaphoric strength has never been greater -- really funny, among other things, a dark, dark laughter" (C.K. Williams).


Author Notes

Anne Sexton (1928-1974) is one of the most influential & frequently discussed American poets. She lived all her life in the Boston area.

(Publisher Provided) Poet Anne Sexton was born in Newton, Massachusetts in 1928. She attended Garland Junior College for a year and at nineteen, married Alfred Muller Sexton II.

After the birth of her first daughter in 1953 and her second daughter in 1955, Sexton suffered mental breakdowns, which included attempting suicide on her birthday in 1955. She had been diagnosed with postpartum depression. Both times she was hospitalized at Westwood Lodge and it was there that her doctor got her to pursue her interest in writing poetry. She enrolled in a poetry workshop at the Boston Center for Adult Education in 1957, which is where she met fellow poet, and soon to be close friend, Maxine Kumin. Sexton then wrote "To Bedlam and Part Way Back" (1960), "All My Pretty Ones" (1962), and in 1966, Sexton won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry for "Live or Die." Sexton wrote about controversial subjects, which included abortion and drug addiction. As with many other "confessional" poets, Sexton wrote of emotional anguish which came from her battle with mental illness.

In 1974, she lost that battle and committed suicide.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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