Cover image for Ran
Title:
Ran
Author:
Kurosawa, Akira, 1910-1998.
Uniform Title:
Ran (Motion picture)
Edition:
[DVD version].
Publication Information:
New York : Wellsping, 2003.
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (160 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
In 16th century Japan, an aging ruler attempts to divide his kingdom among his three sons. They turn against each other and betray their father, triggering events that ultimately shatter the kingdom, destroy the family, and drive their father insane. Based on Shakespeare's King Lear.
General Note:
Originally produced as a motion picture in 1985.

Special features: Audio commentary by film historian Stephen Prince and producer Peter Grilli; production notes; restoration demo; filmography of Akira Kurosawa; trailers.

For specific features see interactive menu.
Language:
Japanese
ISBN:
9780794203368
UPC:
720917536729
Format :
DVD

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Central Library DVD 5864 Adult DVD Media Room-Foreign Language Video
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Audubon Library DVD 5864 Adult DVD Foreign Language
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Summary

Summary

Ran is Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa's reinterpretation of William Shakespeare's King Lear. The Lear counterpart is an elderly 16th-century warlord (Tatsuya Nakadai), who announces that he's about to divide his kingdom equally among his three sons. In his dotage, he falls prey to the false flattery of his treacherous sons (Akira Terao and Jinpachi Nezu), while banishing his youngest son (Daisuke Ryu), the only member of the family who loves him enough to tell him the unvarnished truth. Thanks to his foolish pride, his domain collapses under its own weight as the sons battle each other over total control. Kurosawa's first film in five years, Ran had been in the planning stages for twice that long; Kurosawa had storyboarded the project with a series of vivid color paintings that have since been published in book form in England. The battle scenes are staged with such brutal vigor that it's hard to imagine that the director was 75 years old at the time. This 160-minute historical epic won several international awards, but it was not a hit in Japan, and it would be five more years before Kurosawa would be able to finance another picture. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi


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