Cover image for Nuit et brouillard Night and fog
Title:
Nuit et brouillard Night and fog
Author:
Dauman, Anatole, 1925-1998.
Edition:
[DVD version].
Publication Information:
[United States] : Criterion Collection, [2003]

©1955
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (31 min.) : sound, black and white ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Ten years after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps, this piece documents the abandoned grounds of Auschwitz and Majdanek. One of the first cinematic reflections on the horrors of the Holocaust and contrasts the stillness of the abandoned camps' quiet, empty buildings with haunting wartime footage.
General Note:
Originally released as a motion picture in 1955.

For specific features see interactive menu.
Language:
French
Reading Level:
MPAA rating: Not rated.
ISBN:
9780780026940
UPC:
037429180822
Format :
DVD

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DVD 5895 Adult DVD Foreign Language
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D805.A2 N84 2003V Adult DVD Media Room-Foreign Language Video
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DVD 5895 Adult DVD Foreign Language
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D805.A2 N84 2003V Adult DVD Foreign Language
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Night and Fog represents the peak of director Alain Resnais' activities as a short-subject filmmaker. Framed as a documentary, the film is an unsettling view of life inside the Nazi concentration camps of World War II. As he would in his later features (Hiroshima Mon Amour, Last Year at Marienbad et. al.) Resnais toys with chronology, with memory becoming present reality and vice versa at several critical junctures. Jean Cayrol, later responsible for the script of Resnais' Muriel (1962), wrote the narration for Night and Fog. The film was originally released in France as Nuit et Brouillard. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

A decade after the Nazi concentration camps were liberated, French New Wave pioneer Alain Renais (Hiroshima Mon Amour; Last Year at Marienbad) captured the desolate killing grounds, contrasting them with wartime footage of genocidal atrocities. Using a carefully measured voice-over with music intended to avoid the typical emotional response, Renais encourages a thoughtful consideration of the Holocaust, with time and memory presaging themes the director would revisit in his subsequent dramatic features. A succinct documentary not lacking for impact. [See Trailers, LJ 6/1/16] © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.