Cover image for The wedding
Title:
The wedding
Author:
Bunting, Eve, 1928-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Watertown, MA : Whispering Coyote/Charlesbridge, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
One by one, Miss Brindle Cow encounters a group of animals who are late for a wedding and agrees to carry them there.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.3 0.5 70117.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781580890403
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

On her way to town, Miss Brindle Cow meets a host of animals who are late for a very important wedding. What can she do? Gracious Miss Cow doesn't miss a beat. One by one, they climb on her back--the organist, the pastor, the florist, and more. But where is the bride?
Eve Bunting's charming text and Iza Trapani's delightful illustrations make a winning pair.


Author Notes

Eve Bunting was born in 1928 in Maghera, Ireland, as Anne Evelyn Bunting. She graduated from Northern Ireland's Methodist College in Belfast in 1945 and then studied at Belfast's Queen's College. She emigrated with her family in 1958 to California, and became a naturalized citizen in 1969.

That same year, she began her writing career, and in 1972, her first book, "The Two Giants" was published. In 1976, "One More Flight" won the Golden Kite Medal, and in 1978, "Ghost of Summer" won the Southern California's Council on Literature for Children and Young People's Award for fiction. "Smokey Night" won the American Library Association's Randolph Caldecott Medal in 1995 and "Winter's Coming" was voted one of the 10 Best Books of 1977 by the New York Times.

Bunting is involved in many writer's organizations such as P.E.N., The Authors Guild, the California Writer's Guild and the Society of Children's Book Writers. She has published stories in both Cricket, and Jack and Jill Magazines, and has written over 150 books in various genres such as children's books, contemporary, historic and realistic fiction, poetry, nonfiction and humor.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. Clever writing and sweet watercolor illustrations tell the story of a good-natured cow who gives a lift to a variety of animals she meets on the way to a wedding. Each animal has an important role in the wedding, but for one reason or another, can't get to the church. Pig, the church organist, is sidelined with a knee injury; Turtle, the florist, started out a week early, but still won't make it on time; Chef Chipmunk got lost and is exhausted from his wanderings. These animals (and more) are invited to climb on Miss Brindle Cow's sturdy back as she makes her way to St. Michelle's. Upon arriving at the church (on time), the animals thank the cow and invite her to, Please join us inside. Then comes her surprising reply: Yes . . . I'm the bride. The rhyming verse has a nice easy flow that is perfect for reading aloud, and Trapani's beautifully detailed, fresh country scenes are great for sharing in both intimate or large group settings. Add this to the list of fun summer reads. --Lauren Peterson Copyright 2003 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Miss Brindle Cow sashays down a forest path as she hears wedding bells ring in the distance. She runs into a pig, a turtle, a duck, a rabbit, a chipmunk, and a thrush. Each animal has a role to play in the ceremony and all have a reason for running late, so the cheerful bovine happily carries all of the creatures in a precarious pile on her back. The rhyming text grows ever more buoyant as they approach the church and the cow announces that she is the bride. The watercolor paintings pleasantly evoke an English countryside in greens, browns, and yellows. However, it is somewhat discordant to hear the cow announce, "I am woman. I am strong. I'm happy that you came along." This consciousness-raising sentiment does not match the silliness of the story and the illustrations. An additional purchase.-Susan Pine, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.