Cover image for The Mexicans : a sense of culture
Title:
The Mexicans : a sense of culture
Author:
Merrell, Floyd, 1937-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xi, 276 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Getting it, between cultures -- The importance of Mexico's past -- This new world, Spanish style -- Conquest and colony -- Cultural hybridity emerging -- Making today's Mexico : criollos, independence, and caudillos -- The Mexican mind : an interlude -- Making today's Mexico : the nineteenth century and the Mexican Revolution -- Problems that wouldn't go away -- Particular Mexican ways -- Making today's Mexico, or, How and why are there two Mexicos? -- Along the political roller coaster -- And now, pre-postmodern Mexico? -- Flying high or primed for a fall?
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780813340432

9780813340449
Format :
Book

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F1210 .M477 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Explores Mexicos' diverse cultures, and the cultures of Latin America including AmerIndian, African-American, European, and ethnically diverse groups, beginning with the conquest and colonization.. Explores Mexicos' diverse cultures, and the cultures of Latin America including AmerIndian, African-American, European, and ethnically diverse groups, beginning with the conquest and colonization. This historical overview of Mexico focuses on understanding the daily life of the country, including its complex artistic, political, economic, and social patterns 0813340446 the Mexicans : a Sense of Culture


Summary

This historical overview of Mexico explores at every opportunity what it is that makes contemporary Mexico the fascinating and vibrant melange of cultures that it is. Embracing an exuberant array of ethnic diversity?including Amerindian, African-American, and European cultures?Mexico is emblematic of much of the clash and combination of cultures that characterizes virtually all of Latin America, from the earliest European conquest and colonization to the present day, The Mexicans: A Sense of Culture captures and reveals the intriguing complexities of daily life in Mexico, from its artistic pursuits to its political and economic patterns.


Author Notes

Floyd Merrell is professor of Latin American literature and culture, and semiotic theory, in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at Purdue University. He is Visiting Professor at the Pont#65533;ficia Universidade de S#65533;o Paulo and the Universidade Federal da Bahia (Brazil). His many books include Sobre Las Culturas y Civilizaciones Latinoamericanas ( On Latin American Cultures and Civilizations ).


Floyd Merrell is professor of Latin American literature and culture, and semiotic theory, in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at Purdue University. He is Visiting Professor at the Pont#65533;ficia Universidade de S#65533;o Paulo and the Universidade Federal da Bahia (Brazil). His many books include Sobre Las Culturas y Civilizaciones Latinoamericanas ( On Latin American Cultures and Civilizations ).


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This very readable book by a prolific writer on cultural and semiotic theory aims to give readers a "feel" for Mexican culture and for what makes such close neighbors so unlike Americans. Merrell (Latin American literature and culture, Purdue Univ.) intersperses summaries of Mexican history from the conquest to the present, with exegesis of concepts key to the Mexican national character--machismo, caudillismo, personalismo, and more. He highlights the cultural diversity and subtleties of modern Mexico and occasionally explicitly contrasts Mexican traits with those north of the border. For undergraduates, the primary intended audience, this book may fall short. The prose is fluid, even chatty. However, the frequent and repetitive abstractions offered by Merrell are not sufficiently flushed out with vivid examples, anecdotes, or illustrations. A host of other works in print, such as Alan Riding's Distant Neighbors (1984), or new works in translation by prominent Mexican intellectuals like Carlos Fuentes or sociologists and political scientists like Jorge Castaneda, describe the uniqueness of Mexican culture and character and discuss the last few turbulent decades of Mexican history. Those books strike better balances between the abstract and the vivid. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels and libraries. P. R. Sullivan independent scholar


Choice Review

This very readable book by a prolific writer on cultural and semiotic theory aims to give readers a "feel" for Mexican culture and for what makes such close neighbors so unlike Americans. Merrell (Latin American literature and culture, Purdue Univ.) intersperses summaries of Mexican history from the conquest to the present, with exegesis of concepts key to the Mexican national character--machismo, caudillismo, personalismo, and more. He highlights the cultural diversity and subtleties of modern Mexico and occasionally explicitly contrasts Mexican traits with those north of the border. For undergraduates, the primary intended audience, this book may fall short. The prose is fluid, even chatty. However, the frequent and repetitive abstractions offered by Merrell are not sufficiently flushed out with vivid examples, anecdotes, or illustrations. A host of other works in print, such as Alan Riding's Distant Neighbors (1984), or new works in translation by prominent Mexican intellectuals like Carlos Fuentes or sociologists and political scientists like Jorge Castaneda, describe the uniqueness of Mexican culture and character and discuss the last few turbulent decades of Mexican history. Those books strike better balances between the abstract and the vivid. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels and libraries. P. R. Sullivan independent scholar