Cover image for Come out and play, little mouse
Title:
Come out and play, little mouse
Author:
Kraus, Robert, 1925-2001.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First Mulberry edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Mulberry Books, 1995.

©1987
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Big Brother saves Little Mouse from a cat's treacherous invitation to come out and play.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
BR Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC K-2 1.6 1 Quiz: 25155 Guided reading level: H.
ISBN:
9780688140267

9780738315300
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

When little mouse accepts the cat's invitation to play, he doesn't know what kind of game the cat really has in mind. "A splendid picture book with brilliantly colored and expressive illustrations, funny and exciting."--Horn Book.


Author Notes

Robert Kraus was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on June 21, 1925. When he was 10-years-old, he won a cartoon contest staged by the Milwaukee Journal. He received a plaque and had his cartoon printed in the paper. Two years later, the newspaper hired him to produce a weekly cartoon called Public Nuisances. By the time he was 16-years-old, he was selling cartoons to magazines like Esquire and the Saturday Evening Post. He studied at Milwaukee's Layton Art School and the Art Students' League in New York.

After selling a few cartoons to The New Yorker, he was hired by the magazine as a contract artist. He worked there for 15 years and created 21 covers. While there, he started writing and illustrating children's books. His books included All the Mice Came, Leo the Late Bloomer, and Whose Mouse Are You? He left The New Yorker in 1966 and founded Windmill Books. Within a year, the house had won a prestigious Caldecott Medal. After 20 years, he sold Windmill to Simon and Schuster. In 1983, he began a syndicated Sunday comic feature, called Zap! The Video Chap. He died of congestive heart failure on August 7, 2001 at the age of 76.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3-5. The mouse family that first appeared in Whose Mouse Are You? (Booklist 66:1280 Je 15 70) is back again in a story awash with surprises. A little mouse is busy helping his family with various chores, but each day through the mouse hole a silky voice cajoles ``Come out and play, little mouse.'' On Saturday the little mouse's schedule is free and though he has lots of ideas for fun (ball, kick the can, hopscotch), his playmate, whom readers have only glimpsed as a long reaching arm and an evil eye, turns out to be a wily cat wanting a serious game of cat and mouse. The little mouse looks like he's in trouble until a blue-and-gold dog comes to the rescue. There's an unexpected ending the dog turns out to be the little mouse's brother in costume. Although this lacks the pleasing simplicity of the earlier tale, little ones will find plenty to like here. Aruego and Dewey's energetic illustrations in bright, pure colors tumble over two-page spreads. Children will delight in finding the various parts of the cat that appear at the mouse hole as he tries to lure the mouse out, and the fight between the orange cat and blue-and-gold dog has the feisty appeal of Saturday morning cartoon shows. The computers, video cameras, and sports car tucked in the drawings update the original story. IC. Mice Fiction / Days Fiction [CIP] 85-30198


Publisher's Weekly Review

Like last year's Where Are You Going, Little Mouse?, this well-designed book is in vivid color, with humorously detailed illustrations. On Monday, a wily cat says to Little Mouse, ``Come out and play.'' The mouse replies: ``I can't play today . . . ask me tomorrow.'' The cat asks daily, and Little Mouse begs off daily, with good excuses each timeshopping, painting, laundry, homework, cleaning. On Saturday, Baby Mouse responds to his request, ``My big brother's busy, but I'll play with you.'' Just as readers may have suspected, that cat has definite plans, and it looks as if he'll get his way, until a dog appears! A surprising revelationand all's well that end's well. Exciting yet reassuring fare by a talented trio. Ages 3-6. (April) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2 Big brother mouse evades the cat's invitations to ``come out and play.'' Monday through Friday, he helps shop, paint, wash, and so on. On Saturday, little mouse ingenuously accepts, and is rescued by big brother in dog disguise. Each day's action is introduced: ``Monday /Come out and play, little mouse.'' ``Tuesday /Come out and play, little mouse.'' The resulting jagged rhythm is broken when little mouse engages in cat-and-mouse, but action and rhythm come to a sudden conclusion on Sunday, when the mice can't play because, ``We're playing with our family.'' The plot is unresolved after a week of avoidance because the mice don't confront the cat or suggest that they will never play with him. Illustrations are vivid and busy; garish orange and red mark the sly advances of a leering cat. The landscape evokes recollections of Whose Mouse Are You? (Macmillan, 1970) and the family is familiar. However, in contrast to the simplicity and completeness of its predecessor, this title is frantic, pat, and unsatisfying. Carolyn Noah, Worcester Public Library, Mass. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.