Cover image for Voices from the Trail of Tears
Title:
Voices from the Trail of Tears
Author:
Rozema, Vicki, 1954-
Publication Information:
Winston-Salem, N.C. : J.F. Blair, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xvi, 240 pages : map ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780895872715
Format :
Book

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E99.C5 V65 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

During the first half of the 19th century, as many as 100,000 Native Americans were relocated west of the Mississippi River from their homelands in the East. The best known of these forced emigrations was the Cherokee Removal of 1838. Christened Nu-No-Du-Na-Tlo-Hi-Lu--literally "the Trail Where They Cried"--by the Cherokees, it is remembered today as the Trail of Tears. In Voices from the Trail of Tears, editor Vicki Rozema re-creates this tragic period in American history by letting eyewitnesses speak for themselves. Using newspaper articles and editorials, journal excerpts, correspondence, and official documents, she presents a comprehensive overview of the Trail of Tears--the events leading to the Indian Removal Act, the Cherokees' conflicting attitudes toward removal, life in the emigrant camps, the routes westward by land and water, the rampant deaths in camp and along the trail,the experiences of the United States military and of the missionaries and physicians attending the Cherokees, and the difficulties faced by the tribe in the West. "O what a year it has been!" wrote one witness accompanying a detachment westward in December 1838. "O what a sweeping wind has gone over, and carried its thousands into the grave." This book will lead readers to both rethink American history and celebrate the spirit of those who survived.

Vicki Rozema is the author ofCherokee Voices: Early Accounts of Cherokee Life in the East andVoices from the Trail of Tears. Also an acclaimed photographer, she is a history professor at the University of Tennessee. The first edition ofFootsteps of the Cherokees received an Award of Merit from the Tennessee Historical Commission in 1996. Her honors include the 2014 McClung Award for an article that appeared in the 2013 Journal of East Tennessee History and the Native American Eagle Award for her writings on the Cherokee.

"This work, like Cherokee Voices, is a compilation of letters, newspaper editorials, journal excerpts, church records, and military documents, written by a diverse group of Cherokees and Euroamericans. As the title suggests, Voices from the Trail of Tears is a moving account of the forced removal of thousands of Cherokees in the 1830s; Rozema does a remarkable job of 're-creating this tragic period in American history by letting eyewitnesses speak for themselves.'" - Ginny Carney Studies in American Indian Literature


Author Notes

Vicki Rozema is the author ofCherokee Voices: Early Accounts of Cherokee Life in the East andVoices from the Trail of Tears. Also an acclaimed photographer, she is a history professor at the University of Tennessee. The first edition ofFootsteps of the Cherokees received an Award of Merit from the Tennessee Historical Commission in 1996. Her honors include the 2014 McClung Award for an article that appeared in the 2013 Journal of East Tennessee History and the Native American Eagle Award for her writings on the Cherokee.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

The Indian Removal Act of 1830 authorized the Federal government to relocate the so-called Five Civilized Tribes of the Southeast to lands beyond the Mississippi River. Perhaps the fate of the Cherokees was most tragic; the Cherokees had developed a written language, became fervent Christians, and some even owned slaves. Apparently, they did everything possible to act "civilized" (or white). What they couldn't do, of course, was change the color of their skin, and that doomed them. Rozema, who has previously written extensively on Cherokee history and culture, uses a variety of primary sources, including eyewitness accounts, to recount their sad fate, climaxed by a forced march to Oklahoma during which thousands died. Missionaries write outraged letters describing the mistreatment of Cherokees by white opportunists and government officials. Ordinary soldiers charged with rousting families from their homes describe the suffering of victims. This compilation is often stunning and heartbreaking in its impact, and it is a necessary reminder of one of the most shameful episodes in our history. --Jay Freeman


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xi
Epigraphp. 1
Introductionp. 3
I Hope My Bones Will Not Be Deserted by You--1821 and 1829p. 42
Excerpts from the Cherokee Phoenix and Indians' Advocate on laws preventing the sale of Cherokee landsp. 43
First Blood Shed by the Georgians--February 1830p. 46
Editorial by Elias Boudinot from the Cherokee Phoenix and Indians' Advocatep. 48
The Enemies of Georgia--1831p. 50
Excerpt from the Reverend Samuel Worcester's account of his second arrest by the Georgia Guardp. 54
That Paper Called a Treaty--March 1836p. 62
Report of Major William M. Davis to Secretary of War Lewis Cassp. 63
Your Fate Is Decided--March 1837p. 65
Brigadier General John E. Wool's appeal to the Cherokeesp. 67
The Talk--August 1837p. 70
Excerpts from the journal of George W. Featherstonhaugh on the Cherokee General Council at Red Clayp. 72
Too Sick to Travel--October-December 1837p. 79
Captain B. B. Cannon's journal of a land detachmentp. 81
A Distance Short of 800 Miles--January 1838p. 93
Dr. G. S. Townsend's report of a land detachmentp. 95
Under Weigh at Daylight--June 1838p. 98
Excerpts from the Journal of Occurrences on the route of a party of Cherokee emigrants by Lt. E. Deasp. 101
Feelings of Discontent--June-September 1838p. 110
General Nathaniel Smith's report to Major General Winfield Scott on the Whitely and Drane water detachmentsp. 112
Report of Captain G. S. Drane to Major General Winfield Scottp. 113
Until the Sickly Season Should Pass Away--July 1838p. 116
Letter from Chief John Ross and members of the Cherokee Council to Major General Winfield Scottp. 118
General Winfield Scott's replyp. 120
Resolution adopted by the Cherokee Nation conferring power on John Ross and others to undertake the emigration to the Westp. 122
For the Comfort and Well-being of This People--Summer 1838p. 124
Letter from Captain John Page to Commissioner of Indian Affairs C. A. Harrisp. 126
Dr. J. W. Lide's list of physicians employed in the emigration and letter to Captain John Pagep. 127
The Sadness of the Heart--August 1838p. 131
Letter from Cherokee leader William Shorey Coodey to John Howard Payne on the departure of a land detachmentp. 133
A Year of Spiritual Darkness--June and December 1838p. 136
Excerpts from the journal of the Reverend Daniel Sabine Butrickp. 138
Hail, Rain, Wind and Thunder--March 1839p. 149
Excerpts from the journal of Dr. W. J. J. Morrowp. 150
One Old Man Named Tsali--November-December 1838p. 154
The story of Tsali, as related to James Mooney by the Cherokeesp. 157
The involvement of Euchella, or U'tsala, in the story of Tsali, as related to James Mooney by the Cherokeesp. 158
Excerpt from the report of First Lieutenant C. H. Larned to General Winfield Scottp. 160
Letter from John Page, captain and principal disbursing agent, to T. Hartley Crawford, commissioner of Indian Affairsp. 162
Murdered from an Ambush--June 1839p. 163
Excerpt of letter from John Adair Bell and Stand Watie to the Arkansas Gazette on the murders of the Ridges and Boudinotp. 166
Letter from John Ross to General Matthew Arbucklep. 169
A Citizen of the State of North Carolina--1847 and 1858p. 170
"An Act in favor of the Cherokee Chief, Junoluskee," as introduced in the North Carolina General Assemblyp. 173
Excerpt from William Holland Thomas's speech before the North Carolina Senate, as printed in the Weekly Standardp. 174
If Not Rejoicing, at Least in Comfort--1864p. 178
Excerpt from the Memoirs of Lieut.-General Scott, LL.D.: Written by Himselfp. 179
Appendix 1 Guide to Cherokee Detachments, 1837-39p. 189
Appendix 2 General Winfield Scott's Removal Order No. 25p. 194
Appendix 3 General Winfield Scott's Removal Order No. 62p. 200
Appendix 4 General Winfield Scott's Circular to Cherokee Conductorsp. 202
Appendix 5 General John E. Wool's General Order No. 74p. 204
Endnotesp. 207
Bibliographyp. 227
Indexp. 233