Cover image for Too tough to die
Title:
Too tough to die
Author:
Ramones (Musical group), performer.
Publication Information:
Los Angeles, CA : Sire/Warner Bros./Rhino, [2002]

â„—2002
Physical Description:
1 audio disc : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Punk rock music.

Originally released as Sire [1-]25187, Oct. 1984 (tracks 1-13), and Beggars Banquet 128, Jan. 1985 (tracks 14-15); tracks 16-25 previously unreleased.

Compact disc.

Program notes by Billy Altman and lyrics (19 p. : ill.) inserted in container.
Language:
English
Contents:
Mama's boy -- I'm not afraid of life -- Too tough to die -- Durango 95 -- Wart hog -- Danger zone -- Chasing the night -- Howling at the moon (Sha-la-la) -- Daytime dilemma (Dangers of love) -- Planet earth 1988 -- Humankind -- Endless vacation -- No go -- Street fighting man -- Smash you -- Howling at the moon (Sha-la-la) (demo) -- Planet earth 1988 (Dee Dee vocal version) -- Daytime dilemma (Dangers of love) (demo) -- Endless vacation (demo) -- Danger zone (Dee Dee vocal version) -- Out of here -- Mama's boy (demo) -- I'm not an answer -- Too tough to die (Dee Dee vocal version) -- No go (demo).
UPC:
081227815820
Format :
Music CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
ROCK .R175 T Compact Disc Central Library
Searching...
Searching...
ROCK .R175 T Compact Disc Central Library
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

With the Ramones' original drummer, Tommy Erdelyi, producing, the group returns to simple, scathing punk rock on Too Tough to Die. The group takes the big guitar riffs of Subterranean Jungle and makes them shorter and heavier. The Ramones' rhythms are back up to jackhammer speed and the songs are down to short, terse statements. The results read like a reaction to hardcore punk, but the Ramones are more melodic than any hardcore band, as well as smarter than most. Apart from the occasional foray into pop, such as the surprisingly effective Dave Stewart-produced "Howling at the Moon," the album is a sterling set of lethal punk, the best the Ramones had made since the end of the '70s. It was also the last great record they would ever make. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine