Cover image for Safe by a mile
Title:
Safe by a mile
Author:
Metro, Charlie, 1918-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Lincoln, Neb. : University of Nebraska Press, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xix, 529 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803282810
Format :
Book

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GV865.M49 A3 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Charlie Metro's career runs the gamut of the specialties found in baseball-player, coach, manager, scout, inventor. Metro has lived baseball at every level from the Great Depression to today's multimillion dollar contracts. One of a kind, Metro's life mirrors the astounding changes in the game as well as in the nation. Metro's tale is full of heart and a wealth of anecdotes, the result of a fascinating life and a true love of the game.

Charlie Metro was born Charles Moreskonich in Nanty-Glo, Pennsylvania, in 1919. He played in the major leagues from 1943 to 1945 with the Detroit Tigers and the Philadelphia Athletics. He managed for parts of two seasons, with the 1962 Cubs and the 1970 Kansas City Royals. He also coached the 1965 Chicago White Sox and the 1982 Oakland Athletics. Although he had far longer service in the minor leagues, he will probably be best remembered as one of the great scouts and teachers in baseball history.


Author Notes

Charlie Metro was born Charles Moreskonich in Nanty-Glo, Pennsylvania, in 1919. He played in the major leagues from 1943 to 1945 with the Detroit Tigers and the Philadelphia Athletics. He managed for parts of two seasons, with the 1962 Cubs and the 1970 Kansas City A's. He also coached the 1965 Chicago White Sox and the 1982 Oakland Athletics. Although he had far longer service in the minor leagues, he will probably be best remembered as one of the great scouts and teachers in baseball history
Tom Altherr is a professor of history at the Metropolitan State College of Denver


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Metro was just a journeyman player who, after coming up for a cup of coffee, had a long career as a scout, teacher, and sometime manager. He will never make the Hall of Fame, and yet his insights into the game of baseball are valuable. This thick book is especially strong on minor league baseball during the last half-century, as the peripatetic Metro seems to have visited every small town ballpark imaginable and come away with a tale to tell. For hardcore fans. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Though Metro was a marginal outfielder with the Tigers and the Athletics during the talent-depleted years of WW II, he enjoyed a career in organized baseball that spanned five decades and saw him serve as coach, manager, and scout. Aficionados looking for insider tell-all books like Jim Bouton's Ball Four (1990) will be disappointed. With few exceptions, Metro provides only blandly favorable comment about the innumerable famous and obscure figures who populate his rambling account. Metro's unrelenting optimism and bonhomie undermine his credibility; informed readers will not recognize the portraits of Ty Cobb and Billy Martin presented here. Metro offers little insight into how the baseball business has evolved in the new conditions of free agency or how the playing of the game changed during his long tenure. His opinions occasionally seem bizarre, as when he offers his "all-white" and "all-black" all-time teams. Metro's endless name-dropping, efforts at self-justification, and misplaced nostalgia ultimately make for a tedious book. Those looking for an engaging recent memoir of a vanished era of baseball will do better with Eldon Auker's Sleeper Cars and Flannel Uniforms (2001). Large public collections. D. R. Bisson Belmont University


Table of Contents

List of Illustrationp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. xiii
1 Hookey from High Schoolp. 1
2 The Big Leagues Were a Long Way Offp. 24
3 Up with Detroit and Philadelphiap. 63
4 Go West, Young Manp. 106
5 Points Southp. 157
6 The Road Back to Triple-Ap. 192
7 Mile High, Here We Comep. 227
8 A Car Missing a Wheelp. 250
9 Scouting, the Toughest Job in Baseballp. 281
10 Putting All the King's Men Togetherp. 316
11 If This Is Tuesday, It Must Be Albuquerquep. 345
12 Billy Ballp. 378
13 Retirement? What Retirement?p. 403
14 My Own Hall of Famep. 441
15 I Dream of Baseballp. 469
Appendix Career Statisticsp. 499
Indexp. 503