Cover image for Encyclopedia of American military history
Title:
Encyclopedia of American military history
Author:
Tucker, Spencer, 1937-
Publication Information:
New York : Facts On File, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
3 volumes (xx, 988 pages, 162 pages) : illustrations, maps ; 29 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780816043552

9780816043521

9780816043538

9780816043545
Format :
Book

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E181 .E63 2003 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Reference
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E181 .E63 2003 V.2 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Reference
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E181 .E63 2003 V.3 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Reference
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Summary

Summary

From the first English settlements in North America to the present, the US military has evolved from poorly trained militia formations into the world's most powerful professional military establishment. During that time the nation has fought almost every type of war, from guerilla engagements to global conflicts. In many ways the US military reflects the society from which it evolved; in more recent years, especially, the military has also had an impact on civilian society. Understanding the history of America's wars and its military establishment can help us to understand ourselves and our world a bit better. Presented in three volumes, this encyclopedia is a comprehensive overview of American military history. More than 1200 entries cover military leaders, wars, campaigns, battles, events, famous soldiers, military branches, key technological developments, overviews of weapons systems and more. It covers the period of the colonial wars to the present, and gives special attention to the minorities and women who have contributed significantly to American military success.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Approximately 200 individuals from both academic and military backgrounds contributed to this encyclopedia on American military history. The time period covered is from the colonial wars through the events of September 11, 2001, which, the editor says, "like December 1941, will probably stand as a major turning point in our history." Even though the book has more than 600,000 words, the editor acknowledges the impossible task of including all information about U.S. military history. The focus is on key individuals, including women and minorities; overviews, causes, and effects of America's wars; overviews of weapons systems; and key technological developments. The selective bibliography includes general works, monographs listed by historical periods, miscellaneous works, and encyclopedias and atlases. Basic military terms are described in the glossary. An index to the complete work is included in each volume. Arranged alphabetically, each signed entry opens with dates, if appropriate, and in most cases a short description of the subject (e.g., Crazy Horse Tashunca-uitco ca. 1842-1877 Oglala Sioux chief and one of the most effective Native American war leaders) followed by a longer discussion. See also references are found at the end of each entry along with a short list of works for further reading. The majority of entries average one-half page, but some, such as Aircraft, fixed-wing and World War II, course of U.S. involvement: Europe, run several pages because of their significance and complexity. According to the editor, "Understanding the history of America's wars and its military establishment helps us understand ourselves and our world a bit better." This set does an excellent job of furthering that understanding in a nicely condensed manner. The entries are easy to read, and the entire set presents a pleasing appearance. Black-and-white photos and maps are scattered throughout. This work would make an excellent addition to high-school, public, and academic libraries. -- RBB Copyright 2003 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Tucker (history, Virginia Military Inst.; Encyclopedia of the Vietnam War) is more than qualified to oversee the monumental task of compiling and editing a work such as this. A handsome, three-volume set, it contains more than 1200 alphabetical entries, which span from "Andersonville" to "Yorktown," range in length from less than a page for individual events and biographies to multiple pages for major wars and equipment, and conclude with a brief list of books for further study. Although using hundreds of photos, illustrations, and maps, this excellent work still makes a few omissions in terms of subject (no individual entries for Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush), illustrations (particularly of military ranks and awards that patrons will be looking up), and photographs (why picture a World War I French tank and not a more modern M1 or a historically significant Sherman?). Yet all entries are accessibly written and reflect the knowledge and clear writing style of the author. Highly recommended for larger high school and public libraries.-Lt. Col. (ret.) Charles M. Minyard, U.S. Army, Blountstown, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-With more than 1200 alphabetical entries, this encyclopedia provides a comprehensive and informative overview of the subject, from the Colonial wars through the events of September 11, 2001. Entries include individuals; overviews of the causes, courses, and effects of American wars; and key technological inventions and weapons systems. Women and minorities are well represented. Each concisely written entry is preceded by a brief synopsis or definition, and all retain the focus on the military. For example, presidential biographies stress the military aspects of the administrations. Maps, illustrations, and black-and-white photographs complement the text. Each entry is followed by a short list of suggested readings. A glossary of military terms and a selective bibliography appear in volume three. Careful readers will realize that William Tecumseh Sherman's financial career took a setback in 1857, not 1957. A comprehensive, user-friendly resource.-Patricia Ann Owens, Wabash Valley College, Mt. Carmel, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Tucker (Virginia Military Institute), assisted by scholars at similar service academies (US Naval War College, US Army Command and General Staff College, US Naval Academy, and Armed Forces Staff College, although most come from VMI) offers a superb work on US combat engagements from the Colonial period to the end of 2001. Entries cover individuals important in American wars; causes and results of armed conflicts; and salient technological developments, especially weapons systems. Cross-references and a brief bibliography ("Further Reading") follow each essay, with a larger, deliberately selective, inventory at the end of volume 3 of monographs (arranged chronologically) and encyclopedic reference works. Preceding this, a brief but helpful glossary contains acronyms, abbreviations, and intrinsically military terms and phrases that anyone familiar with soldierly and naval life will find essential for communicating outside that community. The volumes are enhanced throughout with black-and-white photographs, prints, and maps. Providing the complete index at the end of each volume, a somewhat unorthodox editorial decision, works to the reader's benefit. Tucker's book compares favorably with a recent one-volume work of similar scope, The Oxford Companion to Military History ed. by John Whiteclay Chambers et al. (CH, Sep'00), which provides a list of US Armed Forces ranks and their corresponding insignia while Tucker's does not, but such information is readily accessible online (DefenseLINK and GIJargon . The succinct identifying phrase with which Tucker begins each entry makes this work easily accessible to general educated readers of virtually any age as well as to specialists. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All collections. F. J. Augustyn Jr. Library of Congress


Excerpts

Excerpts

The United States boasts a colorful and varied military history. From the first English settlements in North America to the present, the U.S. military has evolved from poorly trained militia formations into the world's most powerful professional military establishment. During that time our nation has fought almost every type of war, from guerrilla engagements to global conflicts. In many ways the U.S. military reflects the society from which it evolves; in more recent years, especially, the military has also had an impact on civilian society. Understanding the history of America's wars and its military establishment can help us to understand ourselves and our world a bit better.Presented in three volumes, the Encyclopedia of American Military History is a comprehensive overview of this fascinating subject, spanning the period from the colonial wars to recent times. More than 1,200 entries cover military leaders, wars, campaigns, battles, events, famous soldiers, military branches, key technological developments, overviews of weapons systems, and more. Giving special attention to the minorities and women who have contributed significantly to American military success, all three volumes contain inclusive, insightful, and interesting information on an array of individuals and topics from America's military past.Several complementary features allow the reader to gain further insight into the most important topics. The 200 black-and-white photographs of famous military personnel, battlegrounds, weapons, and technological innovations bring the text to life. Maps help locate events, and a glossary defines basic military terms that may not be familiar to students and general readers. The selective bibliography is easy to use and is divided into three categories--general reference works, monographs by chronological period, and encyclopedia and atlases--guiding users to valuable sources for further research.Fully cross-referenced entries include: Andersonville, GA Army Nurse Corps Articles of Confederation Baconâ's Rebellion Mary Ann Ball Bickerdyke Black Hawk John C. Breckenridge Battle of Buena Vista Aaron Burr Cavalry USS Chesapeake v. HMS Shannon Crazy Horse Cuban Missile Crisis Espionage David Glasgow Farragut Fort McHenry Frontier posts Harlem Heights Hungnam Evacuation Iroquois War Thomas Jonathan Stonewall Jackson Siege of Khe Sanh Charles Lindbergh Medals and decorations Battle of Monmouth Court House Monte Cassino Napalm Office of Strategic Services (OSS) Paris Accords Pequot War Queen Anne's War Herbert Norman Schwarzkopf Strategic bombing, World War II Dorothy Constance Stratton Raid on Tokyo War reporting Women's Army Corps Campaign of Yorktown. Excerpted from Encyclopedia of American Military History All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.