Cover image for Casey at the bat : a ballad of the republic sung in the year 1888
Title:
Casey at the bat : a ballad of the republic sung in the year 1888
Author:
Thayer, Ernest Lawrence, 1863-1940.
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.3 0.5 46279.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689854941
Format :
Book

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PS3014.T3 C3 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3014.T3 C3 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Summary

Summary

The outlook wasn't brilliant
for the Mudville nine that day:
The score stood four to two
with but one inning more to play....
Since 1888 Casey at the Bat has been read and loved by baseball fans around the world. Now Mighty Casey has been brought to life by celebrated illustrator C. F. Payne, who captures the old-fashioned fun of an afternoon at the ballpark for a brand-new generation.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-8. This attractive, humorous version of the classic ballad features turn-of-the-century ballplayers, farmers, and fans. Rendered in acrylics, watercolor, oil, ink, and colored pencil, the art portrays a muscular Casey with handlebar mustache, ruddy cheeks and nose, cleft chin, and steam shooting from his ears after the second strike. Burly Casey's upper body musculature is so massive, he would be suspected of steroids today. Payne has a talent for distorting perspective for dramatic effect. The cover, for example, emphasizes Casey's immense shoulders, arms, and hands. Exaggerated human faces confer a garish quality that will amuse older kids, but younger kids may be taken aback. Smaller collections may not be able to squeeze another "Casey" onto their shelves, but larger collections will welcome this handsome interpretation. --Linda Perkins


Publisher's Weekly Review

"The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Mudville nine that day"-but it certainly is for this robustly entertaining picture book, as Payne (Micawber) takes a swing at Thayer's beloved poem and knocks it out of the park. The tale of infield pomp and ignominy seems made-to-measure for Payne's statuesque characters, with their outsize noses and ears and florid faces. Standing head and broad shoulders above them all is the "mighty" (if overconfident) Casey; with his impressive porkchop sideburns and handlebar moustache, he looks every inch the Victorian gentleman-athlete. Payne injects a number of droll touches: a small inset of a gravestone enscribed "R.I.P. Cooney" accompanies the phrase "when Cooney died at first," for instance, while "defiance gleamed in Casey's eye, a sneer curled Casey's lip" occasions a batter's-eye view of a skinny and clearly terrified pitcher. For an ingenious take on Casey's approach to his at-bat ("Then from 5,000 throats and more there rose a lusty yell;/ It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell"), Payne shows a spread of Mudville, and a farmer and his son listening to the uproar from where they are working on the mountainside. Entirely different in approach from Christopher Bing's starmaking turn with the same material, Payne's equally enjoyable outing is just the ticket for a front-row seat at literature's most famous ballgame. An afterword explains the poem's origin and history. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 5-Payne's caricatures, rendered in a mix of acrylics, watercolor, ink, oils, and colored pencils, are a marvel of texture and personality. Casey himself is the picture of pride-massive upper body, toothpick ankles, rosy cheeks, enormous sideburns, and a handlebar mustache. He's the essence of nonchalance as he steps up to the plate, acknowledging his adoring fans. Payne alternates panoramic spreads with single scenes facing a white page comprised of a stanza and visual detail. At the climax, an extreme close-up of "mighty Casey," smoke coming out of his ears and gums glistening, is followed by a two-page cyclone of empty air consuming the batter. Notes about Thayer and the poem complete the offering. Christopher Bing's version (Handprint, 2000), with its scrapbook setting, provides an elegant window to a distant event. Patricia Polacco's Casey at the Bat (PaperStar, 1997), with its youthful framing story, creates sympathy for and accessibility to a sandlot tragedy. Payne's version brings its own flavor to the classic poem. While the staging details evoke the past effectively, the humor and drama elicit immediate interest. Make room in your lineup for this one.-Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.