Cover image for Ruling planets : your astrological guide to life's ups and downs
Title:
Ruling planets : your astrological guide to life's ups and downs
Author:
Renstrom, Christopher.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperResource, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xiii, 610 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780060199920
Format :
Book

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BF1724 .R46 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Centuries ago, a king wouldn't think of going to war without first consulting the planets. A physician, upon hearing that a patient had fallen ill, would immediately check the placement of the planets to diagnose the disease and decide how best to treat it. Nowadays, people tend to identify with their zodiac sign rather than with their Planet. Each of us is born under a specific Ruling Planet. Your Ruling Planet is your celestial guide, helping you to navigate your way through life and relationships. Unlike zodiac signs, which are static, planets are in constant motion, changing as you change. Here is the first book to draw on this older and more illuminating tradition. In Ruling Planets Christopher Renstrom shows you how your Ruling Planet plays a collaborative role in nearly every decision you make. It's this active partnership between person and Planet that is missing from today's astrology books. The book is divided into four parts. Part I contains the tables you'll need to find your Ruling Planet. All you have to know is the day and year you were born. In Part II, you learn about your Planet's characteristics, temperament, and outlook and how you are, in effect, a "Child" of this Planet. Because not everyone was born at the same time, the zodiac sign that your Ruling Planet was in on your birthday will color certain traits. Part III presents a detailed and personalized view of you, along with favorable-and not so favorable-times of year. Part IV examines how a Child of one Ruling Planet gets along with a Child of another. These entertaining and thought-provoking insights cover the relationship gamut, from love interests to parents to children to colleagues. Want to know if a relationship has romantic possibilities or if you should just be friends? Check and see which Ruling Planets are involved. What do you do if you got off on the wrong foot with your new boss? A quick glance at his or her Ruling Planet can show you how to finesse a setback into an advance. Ruling Planets will give you a fresh and relevant way of looking at the cosmos and your life. Lushly illustrated with full-color art and photos throughout, Ruling Planets also presents a visual tour that winds its way through myth, history, and popular culture. You'll see your Planet's influence in everything from church frescoes to ad campaigns. You'll also meet some famous (and even infamous) Children of your Planet who will make you question familiar assumptions while expanding your point of view. Whether you are a die-hard astrology fan or an inquisitive skeptic, Ruling Planets will tickle your curiosity and intrigue your imagination. You will return to it again and again, gleaning new information each time.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Ruling Planets Your Astrological Guide to Life's Ups and Downs Introduction Nowadays just about everyone knows his or her zodiac sign. However, the practice of describing oneself as an Aries or a Virgo is actually very recent; in fact, it's not even a hundred years old. Identifying with one's sign is a direct result of the newspaper horoscope column created by the British astrologer R. H. Naylor in 1930. Before then, one would say, "I am a Child of Mars," or "I am a Child of Mercury." Most of us are familiar with the old nursery rhyme describing the qualities of a child born on a particular day of the week: Monday's child is fair of face, Tuesday's child is full of grace, Wednesday's child is full of woe, Thursday's child has far to go, Friday's child is loving and giving, Saturday's child works hard for a living, But a child that's born on the sabbath day is fair and wise and good and gay. It was the Romans, the great believers in patrons, who named the days of the week after the planets in the sky. They believed that anyone born on that particular day would inherit both the planet's personality and sponsorship-in effect becoming a "child" of that planet. Monday belonged to the Moon, thus "fair of face" referred to the Moon's silvery complexion. Tuesday was associated with Mars, a planet named after the god of war, who was prized by the Romans for his athletic grace and prowess. Wednesday was identified with Mercury, and the child "full of woe" was the recipient of this planet's quick mind as well as the nervous tendency to worry too much. Thursday was Jupiter's-the planet of long journeys and adventure (as attested to by the wide reach of the Roman Empire). Friday was Venus's, the planet of love and pleasure and revels-which is still commemorated today with the phrase: T.G.I.F ("Thank God it's Friday"). Saturday was Saturn's-the planet of toil and discipline. Finally, the Sabbath was the Sun's day, and we all know that anyone said to possess a "sunny" personality is going to be cheerful and upbeat. Yet this pantheon of planetary days was itself borrowed by the Romans from an even older astrological tradition that apportioned the calendar year into planetary rulerships. At the heart of the year stood the Sun and Moon-the two brightest and closest "planets." It may be odd to think of the Sun and Moon as planets, but to ancient astronomers, Earth and the heavens were seen as fixed in place, and it was the planets that moved. Sometimes they moved forward. Sometimes they moved backwards. Some were fast. Others were very slow. One night the planets might be spread out across the sky, and on another evening they might be clumped together in one spot. This erratic behavior fostered the belief that there was a greater design to their movement. After all, if observing clouds, tidal flows, and sudden changes in the wind foretold of approaching weather conditions, why wouldn't the same hold true with the planets? Perhaps the planets were somehow trying to communicate something to us through their actions. And if only we could understand them, then we would be that much closer to comprehending how life was supposed to work. Thus it was the planets' movements through the sky that influenced life down here on Earth. The Sun and Moon were seen as exerting their strongest influence in summer, so they ruled the months of July and August, when days are long, nights are warm, and the earth is bursting with life. Mercury ruled the two months flanking July and August, Venus the two months next to those, then Mars and Jupiter. Finally Saturn, the slowest and most distant planet (at least to the naked eye), was assigned rulership of the winter months December and January, when nights are dark, days are cold, and the earth is barren and hard. Yet the influence of the planets reached beyond the months of the year or a person's disposition. Certain herbs were ruled by planets, as were animals and colors, body parts, professions, love interests, countries-even the sky itself was divided up into domains ruled by each planet, so that when, for instance, Venus was traveling through a part of the sky ruled by Mars she behaved more aggressively (i.e., martially) than she did when she was traveling through a part of the sky ruled by the more sedate Moon. It's not unlike the way a woman when traveling in France would dress differently from the way she would if she were traveling in the Middle East. And, of course, whatever affects the planet affects everything that's influenced by it-including its "children." The emphasis on the Ruling Planet is what's missing from today's astrology books and newspaper columns. Traditionally one's Ruling Planet was regarded as a kind of patron saint, a celestial entity that watched over those born under its influence. Your zodiac sign is static, whereas your Ruling Planet will always describe what's going on in the heavens vis-à-vis you, because it is in constant motion. Is it traveling through a part of the sky that presages difficulty or is it signaling a time when you're shedding old ways and yearning for something new? If you think about it, it's not unlike charting the growth of your mutual fund. Keeping tabs on your Ruling Planet allows you to keep a lookout for what's happening in your life. How To Use This Book The first part of this book is made up of Planetary tables. Simply look up the year you were born and then your birthday to find what Planet you were born under. You can think of it as your Ruling (or Birthday) Planet. The second part of this book describes the general characteristics, temperaments, and outlook of each Planet's Children. Some readers will have two Ruling Planets. The reason for this is that ancient astrologers knew of only seven planets. As Uranus, Neptune, and then Pluto were discovered, they were partnered with older or "traditional" planets-moving from the farthest planet (Saturn) back toward the Sun. Imagine if you had only seven sheets of paper for a letter you were writing. After filling them UP, it would become necessary to write on the back of some of them and in a way that would be comprehensible to the person reading it. At the end of each "Child of . . ." chapter you will find a second set of tables. These will tell you what part of the sky (or zodiac sign) your Planet was traveling through on the day you were born. Not everyone was born at a time when his or her Ruling Planet was in power. Most people are a blend of Planetary energies. For instance if you are a Child of Venus with Venus in Aries then you will have a strong Mars streak, because Mars rules the constellation Aries. Planets are not the same as zodiac signs. They are much more powerful. Planets are the actors on the stage, while zodiac signs provide the backdrop to the action. These unique blends of energies-along with good (as well as not so good) times of year -- will be fully explained in Part III. Part IV describes how the Children of the Planets get along with one another -- and what to do when they don't. There is no such thing as a "perfect" match in astrology. Each of us is drawn to a variety of people for a variety of reasons. Relationships are fluid and not set in stone. Part IV explores this by examining each Planetary combination in relationships ranging from love interest to parent to child to colleague. Not only will you have an opportunity to see how the relationship dynamic changes, but you'll also gain further insight into whomever you're asking about by looking up this person's Ruling Planet and taking a look at things from his or her point of view. Think of your Birthday Planet as a coach, sponsor, den mother, and guardian angel all wrapped up in one. Moody and at times partial, it nevertheless tells you when it's time to push for what you want and when to cool it. Your Birthday Planet shows you where you're coming from and where you're going. It affects your relationships, helps you to set priorities, and colors just about every decision you'll ever make, but it doesn't tell you what to do or how to live your life any more than the weather does. Think of Ruling Planets as your personal guide to that wonderfully creative partnership with your "higher" power up there in the sky. As above, so below. Ruling Planets Your Astrological Guide to Life's Ups and Downs . Copyright © by Christopher Renstrom. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from Ruling Planets: Your Astrological Guide to Life's Ups and Downs by Christopher Renstrom All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.