Cover image for Fashion from concept to consumer
Title:
Fashion from concept to consumer
Author:
Frings, Gini Stephens.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Seventh edition.
Publication Information:
Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xxiv, 388 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780130335715
Format :
Book

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TT518 .F74 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

This text explains the entire fashion business, from concept to consumer. Early chapters concentrate on fashion fundamentals such as consumer demand, market research, and design resources. Later chapters cover the development, production, and marketing of raw materials, then move on to describe inte


Excerpts

Excerpts

The purpose of this book is to tell the whole story of how the fashion business works, in sequential order from concept to consumer. The fashion business is a series of buying supplies, creating and developing a new product, and marketing the product. The fashion business includes all the processes involved with producing raw materials, apparel, and accessories and the retail stores that sell fashion merchandise to the public. It is important for executives in the fashion industry to know how all of these processes interrelate. Fashion designers and merchandisers work with textile producers to develop fabrics that they need for their apparel and accessories. Manufacturers must know how to create garments and accessories that sell on the retail level. Retail fashion buyers should understand how garments and accessories are designed so that they can be creative merchandisers and make wise buying decisions. They may also have to develop products and source production themselves for private label merchandise. The entire marketing chain has become interconnected. PART ONE concentrates on fashion fundamentals, information needed by everyone in the fashion business. Chapter 1 traces the development of fashion and the fashion industry as a background to understanding today's business. Chapter 2 shows how consumer demand affects fashion marketing. Chapter 3 explains fashion change and consumer acceptance. Chapter 4 covers market research, fashion analysis, and design resources. PART TWO covers the development, production, and marketing of raw materials, including textiles, trimmings, leather, and fur--the supplies needed for fashion manufacturing. PART THREE discusses international fashion centers and traces the fashion manufacturing process from design and merchandising development through production and marketing to retailers. PART FOUR covers retailing: types of retail organizations, merchandising--the buying and selling process, and marketing. Each chapter contains a career focus, chapter objectives, review questions, terminology, and projects to aid in reviewing the subject matter. The appendix contains information on career guidelines and a glossary of fashion terminology. Just as the fashion industry has changed dramatically over the last 20 years, each edition of Fashion: From Concept to Consumer changes with it. As the industry has become more marketing oriented, so has this book. As the industry has seen a tremendous growth in men's wear and accessories, this book has much more information on both. As computer technology has changed how fashion is produced and distributed, the book describes applications in every area. As production has moved offshore, this book has new information on global sourcing. Fashion explains the changes in relationships between levels of the industry: how some textile companies are producing full-garment packages, how manufacturers have become retailers and retailers have become manufacturers. Fashion: From Concept to Consumer describes how these major changes have affected every aspect of the fashion business. This book tells the complete story of the fashion business and is a valuable tool for any introductory course in fashion, including Introduction to Fashion Design, Introduction to the Fashion Industry or Manufacturing, Introduction to Fashion Merchandising or Retailing, or Introduction to the Fashion Business. There is also important information for trend research, textile marketing, apparel manufacturing, accessory design, production and marketing, and advertising and promotion. This is a text for specialists as well as those who are taking only a single course in fashion. In fact, it will interest anyone who wants to know more about fashion and the fashion business' Excerpted from Fashion: From Concept to Consumer by Gini Stephens Frings All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

I The Fundamentals of Fashion
1 Fashion Development
2 Influences on Fashion Marketing and Consumer Demand
3 Fashion Change and Consumer Acceptance
4 Fashion Research and Analysis
II The Raw Materials of Fashion
5 Textile Fiber and Fabric Production
6 Textile Product Development and Marketing
7 Trimmings, Leather, and Fur
III The Manufacturing of Fashion
8 International Fashion Centers
9 Product and Design Development
10 Apparel Production
11 Accessory and Fur Manufacturing
12 Wholesale Marketing and Distribution
IV Fashion Retailing
13 Retailing
14 Retail Fashion Merchandising
15 Retail Fashion Marketing
Appendix: Career Guidelines
Fashion Industry Terminology
Index