Cover image for Classic joints with power tools
Title:
Classic joints with power tools
Author:
Chan, Yeung.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Lark Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
174 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Electronic Access:
Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/ste021/2002016234.html
ISBN:
9781579902797
Format :
Book

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TA660.J64 C48 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

"Chan takes you through the steps required to make the jo∫ even the most exotic joint will seem easy to make."-- Canadian Woodworking . "Outstanding instructions, illustrations, and colorful photos...All skill levels; should be part of most public library collections."-- Library Journal . "Excellent....The adaptable approach, combined with the sheer number of joints covered, makes this one of the best books on joinery that I've seen."-- Fine Woodworking.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Modern woodworkers rely on machines more than ever before, but the actual joints they use have changed little over the years. Most woodworking titles continue to show a combination of hand-tool and machine techniques, which does not reflect the way many people really work. Chan, a furniture maker, designer, and teacher who studied under James Krenov at the College of the Redwoods, shows readers how to create a vast array of wood joints using just machines (though some do require a little handwork). He describes a number of the most commonly used woodworking machines (the table saw, band saw, router, drill, mortiser, and biscuit joiner) and provides information for building several jigs that would increase both accuracy and safety. The joints range from easy (butt joints) to esoteric (mitered lap with small tenon); the one common element is the outstanding instructions, illustrations, and colorful photos. Another nice feature is that a number of joints that can be made using a common technique (such as doweling) are shown together so that mastery of one process can allow for many applications. This title will be useful to woodworkers of all skill levels and should be part of most public library collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.