Cover image for The Jew of Seville
Title:
The Jew of Seville
Author:
Séjour, Victor, 1817-1874.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Diégarias. English
Publication Information:
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xxxiv, 171 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780252027000
Format :
Book

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PQ3939.S3 D5413 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

'The Jew of Seville' tells the story of Jacob Eliacin, a Jew, during the Spanish Inquisition. Eliacin masquerades as a Christian and becomes a prominent member of the court at Seville, but his background is revealed following his daughter's seduction at the hands of Don Juan.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Shapiro's superb, lively translations of these two plays invite an intimate and extraordinary look into the complexities of being "colored" and free in the antebellum South. Caught between a world that was neither black nor white, Louisiana's free people of color (gens de couleur libres) forged a unique identity of cultural survival. Free from bondage, yet not free from discrimination, they figured prominently in the cultural, social, and political life. A Creole of color, Sejour (1817-74) spent much time in Paris because he was increasingly disillusioned with his second-class citizenship in Louisianna. There, he achieved unprecedented success as a playwright and counted among his friends Victor Hugo and Alexandre Dumas. His work offers a poignant portrayal of racial subjugation. His short stories and plays have as dominant themes religious, social, and racial discrimination. The two translated plays under review here expose the hypocrisy of religious persecution and by extension the abasement endured by Sejour's own people in Louisiana. Although circumstances and fear of reprisals may have prevented many of the Creole-of-color literati from addressing forthrightly their social condition, these two plays expose in subtle and veiled ways the conflict of race and class in 19th-century Louisiana. Shapiro provides excellent introductions and a representative bibliography. All collections; all levels. A. J. Guillaume Jr. Indiana University South Bend