Cover image for Dragon tears
Title:
Dragon tears
Author:
Koontz, Dean R. (Dean Ray), 1945-
Edition:
Unabridged.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Simon & Schuster Audio, [1993]

â„—1993
Physical Description:
11 audio discs (approximately 12 hr.) : Dolby system.
Summary:
Police Detective Harry Lyon is a perfectionist who likes his files error-free. To Harry's dismay, his partner, Connie Gulliver, embraces chaos, urging him to "get in touch with the rhythms of destruction." But when Harry and Connie have to kill in the line of duty, the ensuing surreal nightmare makes Connie's cynical world view seem all to accurate.
General Note:
Compact discs.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780743529044
UPC:
9780743529044
Format :
Audiobook on CD

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Summary

Summary

Police detective Harry Lyon is a perfectionist who likes his condo immaculate, his suits well tailored, and his homicide files error-free. To Harry's dismay, his partner, Connie Gulliver, embraces chaos, urging him to "get in touch with the rhythms of destruction." But when Harry and Connie have to kill in the line of duty, the ensuing surreal nightmare makes Connie's cynical world view seem all too accurate.When that same afternoon, a homeless stranger with bloodshot eyes utters the haunting words that challenge Harry Lyon's sanity..."Ticktock, ticktock. You'll be dead in sixteen hours...Dead by dawn...Dead by dawn...dead by dawn..."


Summary

Straight-arrow police detective Harry Lyon lives life by the book both on and off duty. However, his cynical partner, Connie Gulliver, is the exact opposite. When Harry is forced to kill in the line of duty, his perfectionist view of the world is shattered, and he begins to lose his grip on reality.


Author Notes

Dean Koontz was born on July 9, 1945 in Everett, Pennsylvania. He received a degree in education from Shippensburg State College in 1967. A former high school English teacher as well as a teacher-counselor with the Appalachian Poverty Program, he began writing as a child to escape an ugly home life caused by his alcoholic father. A prolific writer at a young age, he had sold a dozen novels by the age of 25. Early in his career, he wrote under numerous pen names including David Axton, Brian Coffey, K. R. Dwyer, Leigh Nichols, Richard Paige, and Owen West. He is best known for the books written under his own name, many of which are bestsellers, including Midnight, Cold Fire, The Bad Place, Hideaway, The Husband, Odd Hours, 77 Shadow Street, Innocence, The City, Saint Odd, and The Silent Corner.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

The latest from prolific, best-selling Koontz is about Harry and Connie, a male-female cop team that has to catch a psychokiller who interrupts their lunch by opening fire on the restaurant. Shortly thereafter, Harry is threatened with death by a bum with blood-red eyes who's also been threatening street people. Turns out there's no relation between the lunch-loonie and the death-bum, but there is between the bum and Bryan, a rich young maniac gifted with psychokinesis--the ability to move things at his mental bidding. Stephen King has said nice things about Koontz and bad things about grade-B horror meister John Saul, which just goes to show you shouldn't give King's opinions too much weight. Popular though he is, Koontz is a bore. Only if you're stuck on a long flight or overnight in a dinky motel should you read him word for word. This effort gets so stale by the halfway mark that it's impossible to care whether the flatfoots get their ghoul. (Reviewed Dec. 1, 1992)0399137734Ray Olson


Publisher's Weekly Review

Playing police logic against the supernatural, Koontz ( The Bad Place ; Night Chills et al.) delivers fairy-tale horror in the form of a detective thriller. In southern California, police detective Harry Lyon and his partner, Connie Guliver, find themselves hounded by a golem who appears in the shape of a towering vagrant. Called Ticktock because he grants his victims only hours to live, the vagrant has tremendous physical power, a taste for gruesomely described violence and the ability to stop time and rearrange reality. Koontz romps playfully and skillfully through this grown-up enchantment, dealing out such motifs as a talking dog and taking potshots at recognizable pop culture: e.g., the book's epigram is a Garth Brooks lyric, and during a killing spree the murderer yells out titles of Elvis Presley songs. The prose may occasionally strike a false note, but Koontz's breakaway bestseller pace does not dally for the mot juste. As irresistible (and nutritionally valuable) as a stack of brownies. Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club main selections; Mystery Guild featured alternate. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved