Cover image for Police corruption
Title:
Police corruption
Author:
Roleff, Tamara L., 1959-
Publication Information:
Farmington Hills, MI : Greenhaven Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
94 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Overview: ethics and police integrity / Stephen J. Vicchio -- An examination of police corruption / Frank L. Perry -- Police culture encourages corruption / Anthony V. Bouza -- Police are pressured to be corrupt / Julius Wachtel -- Police corruption is fueled by the war on drugs / Joseph D. McNamara -- Drug-related police corruption differs from other forms of police corruption / Richard M. Stana -- Police corruption is rampant / Jack Nelson -- Police routinely lie in court to convict the guilty / Scott Turow -- Few police officers are corrupt / Al Martinez -- Critics exaggerate the problem of police corruption / Joseph Wambaugh -- Corrupt police officers are often heroes / Erica Werner and Paul Chavez -- Federal oversight of police departments is reducing police misconduct / Stephen H. Rosenbaum -- Corrupt police departments are difficult to reform / Eric Monkkonen -- The public must protest police corruption / Kelly Sarabyn -- Personality tests do not indicate the potential for corruption / Jennifer O'Connor Boes, Callie J. Chandler, and Howard W. Timm.
ISBN:
9780737711721

9780737711714
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The questionable activities of police have come under increased scrutiny in recent years. In this engaging anthology, police officers and commentators discuss police ethics and integrity, what factors contribute to police corruption, and whether corruption is rampant in the ranks.


Summary

The questionable activities of police have come under increased scrutiny in recent years. In this engaging anthology, police officers and commentators discuss police ethics and integrity, what factors contribute to police corruption, and whether corruption is rampant in the ranks.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-12. This At Issue volume goes far beyond the simple "Yes, they're corrupt" / "No, they're really not so bad" arguments to examine how the nature of the police profession can breed corruption and deceit. Beginning with an overview that explores morality and integrity from as far back as ancient Greece, the book progresses into deeper, more complex arguments than the long held "one bad apple" theory. Without directly implying that corruption abounds, the essayists provide strong arguments about how new recruits are initiated into a profession that has its own version of the law. The authors suggest that even the most honorable peace officers are unavoidably forced into adhering to a code of silence concerning wrongdoing. While offering no easy solutions to the problem, the book does examine some possible starting points for unveiling the corruption, for holding police accountable to the same (or even stronger) ethical codes as those of most other professions, and for reviving faith in a system that, according to some articles, is frighteningly out of control. Disturbing stuff, bound to spark discussion. --Roger Leslie


Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-12. This At Issue volume goes far beyond the simple "Yes, they're corrupt" / "No, they're really not so bad" arguments to examine how the nature of the police profession can breed corruption and deceit. Beginning with an overview that explores morality and integrity from as far back as ancient Greece, the book progresses into deeper, more complex arguments than the long held "one bad apple" theory. Without directly implying that corruption abounds, the essayists provide strong arguments about how new recruits are initiated into a profession that has its own version of the law. The authors suggest that even the most honorable peace officers are unavoidably forced into adhering to a code of silence concerning wrongdoing. While offering no easy solutions to the problem, the book does examine some possible starting points for unveiling the corruption, for holding police accountable to the same (or even stronger) ethical codes as those of most other professions, and for reviving faith in a system that, according to some articles, is frighteningly out of control. Disturbing stuff, bound to spark discussion. --Roger Leslie


Table of Contents

Stephen J. VicchioFrank L. PerryAnthony V. BouzaJulius WachtelJoseph D. McNamaraRichard M. StanaJack NelsonScott TurowAl MartinezJoseph WambaughErica Werner and Paul ChavezSteven H. RosenbaumEric MonkkonenKelly SarabynJennifer O'Connor Boes and Callie J. Chandler and Howard W. TimmStephen J. VicchioFrank L. PerryAnthony V. BouzaJulius WachtelJoseph D. McNamaraRichard M. StanaJack NelsonScott TurowAl MartinezJoseph WambaughErica Werner and Paul ChavezSteven H. RosenbaumEric MonkkonenKelly SarabynJennifer O'Connor Boes and Callie J. Chandler and Howard W. Timm
Introductionp. 7
1. Overview: Ethics and Police Integrityp. 10
2. An Examination of Police Corruptionp. 18
3. Police Culture Encourages Corruptionp. 23
4. Police Are Pressured to Be Corruptp. 30
5. Police Corruption Is Fueled by the War on Drugsp. 33
6. Drug-Related Police Corruption Differs from Other Forms of Police Corruptionp. 38
7. Police Corruption Is Rampantp. 53
8. Police Routinely Lie in Court to Convict the Guiltyp. 57
9. Few Police Officers Are Corruptp. 60
10. Critics Exaggerate the Problem of Police Corruptionp. 63
11. Corrupt Police Officers Are Often Heroesp. 66
12. Federal Oversight of Police Departments Is Reducing Police Misconductp. 70
13. Corrupt Police Departments Are Difficult to Reformp. 75
14. The Public Must Protest Police Corruptionp. 79
15. Personality Tests Do Not Indicate the Potential for Corruptionp. 81
Organizations to Contactp. 86
Bibliographyp. 89
Indexp. 92
Introductionp. 7
1. Overview: Ethics and Police Integrityp. 10
2. An Examination of Police Corruptionp. 18
3. Police Culture Encourages Corruptionp. 23
4. Police Are Pressured to Be Corruptp. 30
5. Police Corruption Is Fueled by the War on Drugsp. 33
6. Drug-Related Police Corruption Differs from Other Forms of Police Corruptionp. 38
7. Police Corruption Is Rampantp. 53
8. Police Routinely Lie in Court to Convict the Guiltyp. 57
9. Few Police Officers Are Corruptp. 60
10. Critics Exaggerate the Problem of Police Corruptionp. 63
11. Corrupt Police Officers Are Often Heroesp. 66
12. Federal Oversight of Police Departments Is Reducing Police Misconductp. 70
13. Corrupt Police Departments Are Difficult to Reformp. 75
14. The Public Must Protest Police Corruptionp. 79
15. Personality Tests Do Not Indicate the Potential for Corruptionp. 81
Organizations to Contactp. 86
Bibliographyp. 89
Indexp. 92