Cover image for Islamic fundamentalism
Title:
Islamic fundamentalism
Author:
Ojeda, Auriana, 1977-
Publication Information:
San Diego : Greenhaven Press, Thomson/Gale, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
79 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
The difference between Islam and Islamic fundamentalism / Daniel Pipes -- Islam is compatible with democracy / Geneive Abdo -- Fundamentalist Islam is not compatible with democracy / Ausaf Ali -- Islamist misogyny has its roots in Islam / Ibn Warraq -- Islamist misogyny does not have its roots in Islam / Teresa Watanabe -- Islamic fundamentalism is a threat to the United States / Daniel Pipes -- Islam is not a threat to the west / Andrew T. Sullivan -- Islamic fundamentalist schools foster terrorism / Tashbih Sayyed -- Islamist terrorism does not reflect Islam / Margot Patterson -- Fundamentalism exists across all religions / America -- Islamic fundamentalism is being shaped by the west / John O'Sullivan.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780737713305

9780737713312
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Recent incidents of terrorism have elicited controversy over whether Islamic fundamentalism contributes to violence. Authors in this anthology discuss the difference between Islam and Islamic fundamentalism and how they relate to the West.


Summary

Recent incidents of terrorism have elicited controversy over whether Islamic fundamentalism contributes to violence. Authors in this anthology discuss the difference between Islam and Islamic fundamentalism and how they relate to the West.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-12. This slim, useful title in the At Issue series will help Western readers distinguish between the tenets of Islam and the more extreme, and sometimes only vaguely related, beliefs of Islamic fundamentalists. The first of the 11 essays contrasts the two belief systems in general, giving an overview of the second-fastest-growing religion in the world. Later chapters argue whether Islamic fundamentalists derive their misogynistic beliefs, stance against democracy, and focus on terrorism from Islam. The last part of the book opens out into a general discussion of fundamental extremism in other faiths and shows how sometimes, ironically, the West shapes Islamic fundamentalism. Although most of the contributing writers are American professors or journalists, a few are Middle Eastern residents or their descendants, whose experiences add a personal dimension to the political and religious arguments. Appendixes include organizations to contact and a bibliography. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-Some of the best-known commentators on the current relationship of Islam with the industrial countries of the West present their views in short essays. Topics include Islam and democracy, the place of women, threats to the United States, terrorism and Islam, and the nature of fundamentalism. However, the apparent balance of views is thrown off by the organization of the articles. Daniel Pipes and John O'Sullivan, both of whom clearly stand on the "danger" side, are placed first and last in the series, the most powerful positions for influencing readers' opinions. On the other hand, most of the organizations in the contact list appear to advocate mutual understanding. The introduction is well balanced, and each essay is preceded by an abstract summarizing the views presented. The writing style is mostly journalistic; some selections are clearly calculated to appeal to the emotions while others are cool and collected. All of the books in the bibliography were published in 2002, most of the articles in 2001. In comparison, Jennifer Hurley's Islam (Greenhaven, 2000) tackles the same questions with better balance and a wider-ranging series of essays. William Spencer's Islamic Fundamentalism in the Modern World (Millbrook, 1995) provides excellent background information on the topic in a well-balanced manner, though it is dated and lacks the sense of passion generated by the opinionated essays. Ojeda's book is supplemental reading for most libraries.-Jonathan Betz-Zall, City University Library, Everett, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-12. This slim, useful title in the At Issue series will help Western readers distinguish between the tenets of Islam and the more extreme, and sometimes only vaguely related, beliefs of Islamic fundamentalists. The first of the 11 essays contrasts the two belief systems in general, giving an overview of the second-fastest-growing religion in the world. Later chapters argue whether Islamic fundamentalists derive their misogynistic beliefs, stance against democracy, and focus on terrorism from Islam. The last part of the book opens out into a general discussion of fundamental extremism in other faiths and shows how sometimes, ironically, the West shapes Islamic fundamentalism. Although most of the contributing writers are American professors or journalists, a few are Middle Eastern residents or their descendants, whose experiences add a personal dimension to the political and religious arguments. Appendixes include organizations to contact and a bibliography. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-Some of the best-known commentators on the current relationship of Islam with the industrial countries of the West present their views in short essays. Topics include Islam and democracy, the place of women, threats to the United States, terrorism and Islam, and the nature of fundamentalism. However, the apparent balance of views is thrown off by the organization of the articles. Daniel Pipes and John O'Sullivan, both of whom clearly stand on the "danger" side, are placed first and last in the series, the most powerful positions for influencing readers' opinions. On the other hand, most of the organizations in the contact list appear to advocate mutual understanding. The introduction is well balanced, and each essay is preceded by an abstract summarizing the views presented. The writing style is mostly journalistic; some selections are clearly calculated to appeal to the emotions while others are cool and collected. All of the books in the bibliography were published in 2002, most of the articles in 2001. In comparison, Jennifer Hurley's Islam (Greenhaven, 2000) tackles the same questions with better balance and a wider-ranging series of essays. William Spencer's Islamic Fundamentalism in the Modern World (Millbrook, 1995) provides excellent background information on the topic in a well-balanced manner, though it is dated and lacks the sense of passion generated by the opinionated essays. Ojeda's book is supplemental reading for most libraries.-Jonathan Betz-Zall, City University Library, Everett, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.