Cover image for At the edge of the world : caves and late classic Maya world view
Title:
At the edge of the world : caves and late classic Maya world view
Author:
Bassie-Sweet, Karen, 1952-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, [1996]

©1996
Physical Description:
xviii, 245 pages : illustrations, map ; 26 cm
Summary:
"Reconstruction of classic period Maya beliefs about the structure of the universe based on imagery and hieroglyphic texts from lowland cities. Focuses on cosmological meanings of caves in defining the Maya world and connections with supernatural realms, especially the underworld"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 57.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780806128290
Format :
Book

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F1435.3.P5 B37 1996 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Reconstruction of classic period Maya beliefs about the structure of the universe based on imagery and hieroglyphic texts from lowland cities. Focuses on cosmological meanings of caves in defining the Maya world and connections with supernatural realms, especially the underworld--Handbook of Lati


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Deep, dark caves are commonly embodied in the belief systems and worldviews of many cultures. Where ancient Maya civilization developed in southern Mexico and Guatemala, caves are abundant. The Mayas incorporated them into their intricate view of the nature of the world and of human destiny. The reconstruction of Maya religion is based in large part on deciphering glyphic inscriptions and scenes such as those on stone monuments and tomb walls, and also draws from beliefs of the modern Mayas. The research has a long and distinguished history of scholarly accomplishment. Bassie-Sweet builds on that tradition and continues her previous work, concentrating on the role of caves in defining the conceptual boundaries of Maya communities and their relation to guardian deities and periodic renewal ceremonies, which in turn relate to the Mayas' responsibilities for maintaining the continuity of human existence. Bassie-Sweet writes clearly, and for those with some general background in Maya studies, her introductions and summaries serve to bring readers up to date in recent research as well as to provide the context for her analyses. An excellent addition to Mesoamerican archaeology collections. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. A. Dixon emeritus, California State University, Long Beach