Cover image for Redwall
Title:
Redwall
Author:
Jacques, Brian.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Ace Books, 1998.

©1986
Physical Description:
333 pages : illustrations, map ; 17 cm.
Summary:
When the peaceful life of ancient Redwall Abbey is shattered by the arrival of the evil rat Cluny and his villainous hordes, Matthias, a young mouse, determines to find the legendary sword of Martin the Warrior which, he is convinced, will help Redwall's inhabitants destroy the enemy.
Language:
English
Contents:
The wall -- The quest -- The warrior.
Reading Level:
800 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.6 16.0 7129.
ISBN:
9780441005482
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The book that inspired a legend--the first novel in the bestselling saga of Redwall.

Welcome to Mossflower Wood, where the gentle mice have gathered to celebrate a year of peace and abundance. All is well...until a sinister shadow falls across the ancient stone abbey of Redwall. It is rumored that Cluny is coming--Cluny, the terrible one-eyed rat and his savage horde--Cluny, who has vowed to conquer Redwall Abbey! The only hope for the besieged mice lies in the lost sword of the legendary Martin the Warrior. And so begins the epic quest of a bumbling young apprentice--a courageous mouse who would rise up, fight back...and become a legend himself.

"The medieval world of Redwall Abbey--where gallant mouse warriors triumph over evil invaders--has truly become the stuff of legend." - Seattle Post-Intelligencer


Author Notes

Brian Jacques was born in Liverpool, England on June 15, 1939. After he finished St. John's School at the age of fifteen, he became a merchant seaman and travelled to numerous ports including New York, Valparaiso, San Francisco, and Yokohama. Tiring of the lonely life of a sailor, he returned to Liverpool where he worked as a railway fireman, a longshoreman, a long-distance truck driver, a bus driver, a boxer, a police constable, a postmaster, and a stand-up comic. During the sixties, he was a member of the folk singing group The Liverpool Fishermen. He wrote both poetry and music, but he began his writing career in earnest as a playwright. His three stage plays Brown Bitter, Wet Nellies, and Scouse have been performed at the Everyman Theatre.

He wrote Redwall for the children at the Royal Wavertree School for the Blind in Liverpool, where he delivered milk as a truck driver. His style of writing is very descriptive, because of the nature of his first audience, for whom he painted pictures with words, so that they could see them in their imaginations. After Alan Durband, his childhood English teacher, read Redwall, he showed it to a publisher without telling Jacques. This event led to a contract for the first five books in the Redwall series. He also wrote the Castaways of the Flying Dutchman series. He died on February 5, 2011.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The much-loved, fantasy series has morphed into a graphic novel with mixed results. Adapting a favorite is always tricky: creators want to acknowledge the fans but also draw in new readers. In this case, the story has holes that only Redwall devotees can fill, but readers unacquainted with the series will still find themselves caught up in the action. Blevins' art effectively conveys the emotional edge of the animal characters while it maintains a Saturday-morning-cartoon feel. Fun for some, although Redwall fanatics will think part of the magic is missing.--King, Kevin Copyright 2007 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The Redwall series celebrates its 20th anniversary with new releases. Redwall: The Graphic Novel by Brian Jacques, illus. by Bret Blevins, retells the first story in comic form. Blevins delivers action-heavy b&w artwork, which does not shy away from the violence of battle, but captures the epic nature of the abbey's struggle against the rat, Cluny, and his minions. (Philomel, $12.99 paper 144p ages 8-up ISBN 9780-399-24481-0; Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6 Up What on the surface appears to be just another medieval fantasy peopled with animals enacting the fight to the death between good and evil is actually a rich and thought-provoking novel on the nature of good and evil. The peaceful life of the mice of Redwall Abbey is shattered by the onslaught of the fierce rat, Cluny the Scourge, and his army of rats, weasels, and other vermin. The mice and the other peaceful animals take refuge in the Abbey's strong walls while Cluny lays seige. Advantage is with the besieged (as long as food and supplies last), and the Abbey defenders are able to withstand numerous attacks. Cluny cannot be completely defeated, however, until the sword of Martin, the legendary warrior who founded Redwall Abbey, can be found. A young novice, Matthias, embarks on a quest and ultimately finds it, but a wise cat reminds him that it is just a sword. It attained its legendary status because Martin used it only in the defense of right and good. Just as Martin's sword is neither good nor evil, the characters avoid being simply personifications of attributes. The defenders, even Matthias, have faults, while even Cluny displays characteristics which make him not likable, but at least deserving of a grudging admiration. The book is violent, and at some times downright gruesome, but the quality of the writing, the rich cast of characters, the detailed accounts of medieval warfare, and Jacques' ability to tell a good story and make readers think all earn Redwall a place on library shelves. Susan M. Harding, Mesquite Pub . Lib . , Tex. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.