Cover image for Calming your fussy baby : the Brazelton way
Title:
Calming your fussy baby : the Brazelton way
Author:
Brazelton, T. Berry, 1918- (Thomas Berry)
Publication Information:
Cambridge, MA : Perseus, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xii, 111 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm
General Note:
"Advice from America's favorite pediatrician"--cover.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780738207810
Format :
Book

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RJ61 .B73 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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RJ61 .B73 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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RJ61 .B73 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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RJ61 .B73 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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RJ61 .B73 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Parenting
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RJ61 .B73 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Sleepless nights, wailing babies, and defiant toddlers-these are universal issues for new parents. Now beloved pediatrician T. Berry Brazelton and his esteemed colleague the child psychiatrist Joshua Sparrow come to the rescue with these highly effective and affordable guides. Full of empathy, warmth, and wisdom, each book in the Brazelton Way series leads parents step-by-step through these trying struggles. Courtesy of Dr. Brazelton's unparalleled under-standing and experience, parents will emerge from the turmoil relieved, empowered, and full of new pleasure in the strength and progress of their individual child.


Author Notes

Thomas Berry Brazelton Jr. was born in Waco, Texas on May 10, 1918. He received a bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1940 and a medical degree from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1943. He took his pediatric training at Boston Children's Hospital in 1947 and went on to study child psychiatry at Massachusetts General and the James Jackson Putnam Children's Center. In 1950, he began a private practice in pediatrics and was an instructor at Harvard Medical School. He also went on to teach at Brown University.

He revolutionized people's understanding of how children develop psychologically. He wrote around 40 books including Infants and Mothers: Differences in Development, wrote a column in Family Circle magazine, and was the host of the show What Every Baby Knows, which ran for 12 years. He received the World of Children Award for his achievements in child advocacy in 2002 and the Presidential Citizens Medal in 2013. His memoir, Learning to Listen: A Life Caring for Children, was published in 2013. He died on March 13, 2018 at the age of 99.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

This group of four paperback titles will help round out any child-care collection. The Brazelton books, the first three installments of a new series that will surely become a favorite with both new and experienced parents, come in a handy five-by-seven-inch size, perfect to keep on hand in the nursery or in a nightstand. Brazelton is our modern-day Dr. Spock, and his tips for helping parents deal with everyday concerns and special circumstances have become mainstream in current parenting methodology. In tackling fussy babies, discipline, and sleep in these three titles, Brazelton delivers his tried-and-true techniques in a unique but understandable way, making this easy-to-read series one of the more approachable, if slightly oversimplified, ones published today. Using history as her guide, nationally recognized midwife Gaskin explores what she hopes will be a renaissance in natural childbirth, something that she's been advocating since the mid-1970s. By focusing on how women of ancient civilizations and other modern peoples give birth, Gaskin puts our own hypersensitivities in perspective, uncovering a beautiful, sometimes orgasmic experience rather than a dreadful, painful one. Sure, pain is part of childbirth, but preparing for the pain in a realistic rather than sentimental way--whether giving birth at home or in a hospital--can be the key to a woman's ability to deal with it naturally. Within the pages of personal anecdotes, some touching, some startling, from Gaskin's patients and colleagues, every woman is sure to find something to relate to, whether or not she chooses to have a medicine-free labor. The helpful back matter features a glossary, a detailed resource list including advocacy groups and Web sites, and a bibliography that includes periodicals, rounding out an extremely comprehensive and up-to-date guide on the topic. Mary Frances Wilkens