Cover image for Our galaxy and the universe
Title:
Our galaxy and the universe
Author:
Graun, Ken.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Tucson, Ariz. : Ken Press, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
36 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm.
Summary:
Introduces youngsters to the wonders of astronomy by exploring the universe and our own Milky Way Galaxy.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781928771081
Format :
Book

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QB46 .G827 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB46 .G827 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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QB46 .G827 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB46 .G827 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

What are galaxies? How large are they? What are nebulae, globular clusters and black holes? Where are stars born? How big do they get? How do they die.Up-to-date answers to these and other questions can be found in this illustrated book on galaxies and the Universe.Our Galaxy and the Universe introduces youngsters to the wonders of astronomy by exploring the Universe and our own Milky Way Galaxy. Learning about galaxies, stars and nebulae will occur naturally as they examine photographs, compare information and follow the explanatory text. There are even star charts to help find and observe some of the celestial wonders pictured in the book.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-With help from an award-winning science teacher, Graun follows up the excellent Our Earth and the Solar System (Ken, 2001) with a sweeping look at stars, the nebulae in which they are born, the galaxies in which they cluster, and how astronomers use various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum to observe it all. Plainly enthusiastic about their topic, the authors pack every bit of space, front endpapers to rear, with specific, systematically organized information, some of which is repeated or restated several times for emphasis. The illustrations are particularly well chosen and integrated into the discourse. For instance, viewers are challenged to distinguish "local" stars from far more distant galaxies in a deep space photo (and told how), and are later offered not just one view of the Milky Way, but nine, each taken with a different kind of camera or film. For children who've caught the astronomy bug, the authors not only note which of the celestial features they highlight are visible with the naked eye or a small telescope, but also place them on a pair of simplified sky charts. Hard science with an admixture of wonder, this hard-to-resist tour of the Great Beyond merits a place on library shelves alongside Seymour Simon's The Universe (Morrow, 1998).-John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.