Cover image for City chicken
Title:
City chicken
Author:
Dorros, Arthur.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins Publishers, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Egged on by the cat next door, a chicken from the city visits the country to see what she's been missing, and finds that it's not "all it's cracked up to be."
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 66797.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060284824

9780060284831
Format :
Book

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Henry is so confused. She thinks a cow looks like this ... She thinks a horse looks like this ... But when Henry, the city chicken, flies the coop, she finds out that country life is not all it's cracked up to be.


Author Notes

Arthur Dorros, an author and occasional illustrator, was born in Washington, D.C. on May 19, 1950. He attended and graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a B.A. degree in 1972. He received his postgraduate teaching certification from Pacific Oaks College in 1979. He has worked odd jobs in his youth such as: builder, carpenter, drafter and photographer. He was a teacher for both elementary and junior high. He was the artist in residence for more than a dozen New York public schools while running programs in creative writing and bookmaking. Some of his children's books are written in both English and Spanish. He also writes books that deal with science and nature. Ant Cities and Feel the Wind were named Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children by the National Science Teachers Association/Children's Book Council and A Tree is Growing was named an Orbis Pictus Honor Book. He has received the Reading Rainbow Review book selections award for three of his books - Alligator Shoes, Ant Cities and Abuela.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 2. A naive city chicken gets a country education in this pun-filled story. Henrietta (Henry) the chicken believes that most other chickens are just like her: they live in the city and lay blue eggs. It's know-it-all neighbor Lucy the cat who explains about country chickens, horses, cows, and pigs. Wanting to see everything for herself, Henry sets off on a bus trip to the country, where she winds up at an industrial egg farm. The mechanical clamor and speed overwhelm her, and she gladly leaves the noisy country behind and returns to her quiet city life. Dorros' story occasionally lacks focus, culminating in a random ending that imagines chickens in space, and he also leaves lots of questions unanswered (Is it Henry's unusual pizza-based diet that results in the blue eggs?). But his depiction of the farm--a large factory operation--is refreshingly unidealized, and the lively language will entertain the picture-book crowd with age-appropriate jokes and wordplay. Cole's cartoonlike watercolors extend the humor and show Henry's hilariously misinformed view of the world. --Gillian Engberg


Publisher's Weekly Review

One-liners and sight gags are as thick as feathers in a henhouse in Dorros's (Ten Go Tango) and Cole's (The Sissy Duckling) pert poultry drama. Henry ("short for Henrietta") is the city chicken of the title; she lives in a cozy coop in her owner's backyard. Lucy the cat tells her so much about the wondrous animals who live in the country ("They are huge and brown, and let people jump on their backs," she says, describing a horse, while Henry visualizes a Godzilla-size chicken racing through the city streets with seven enthusiastic riders sprawled between her wings) that Henry decides to go and see them for herself. After she makes her way out to rural farmland ("Here's a truck that goes to the country," an ant tells her, gesturing toward a garbage truck. "And they serve great meals on board!"), an encounter with an industrial barn crammed with crated egg-laying hens convinces Henry that the city is where she belongs. " `Was the country all it was cracked up to be?' asked Lucy. `It was different,' said Henry. `But it was not the place for me.' " While disparate themes compete for readers' attention-mechanized agriculture, knowing where one belongs, finding out that not everything lives up to its billing-the dynamic spreads and storytelling relay the action with boisterous energy and humor. Ages 4-8. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Henrietta (Henry, for short) has lived in a chicken coop in the city all of her life. So when Lucy, the cat next door, tells her tantalizing tales of cows ("They eat grass, and milk comes out"), horses, and pigs, the bird decides that it's time to see these wonders for herself. After unsuccessfully attempting to fly to the country, she settles instead for rides on a bus and a garbage truck, and finds herself on a farm. During her wanderings, she completely misidentifies all the animals and then witnesses mass egg production. She is initially confounded and then dismayed by the little cages, automatic grain dispenser, and conveyor-belt egg transportation, and wisely realizes that the city's the place for her. Once she gets home, though, and Lucy regales her with stories of the first chicken astronaut, Henry starts thinking about her next adventure. Sprinkled with puns and references to chicken jokes, this likable tale pokes gentle fun at the baffled but "game" bird in language easily understood by the storytime crowd. Cole's cheerful and expansive watercolor cartoon illustrations pair well with the straightforward text and reflect the silly and slightly exaggerated characters and plot. What this story lacks in sparkle, it makes up for in approachability and good humor. This book will add an "eggs-tra layer" to storytimes featuring such adventuresome chickens as Pauline in Mary Jane Auch's Eggs Mark the Spot (Holiday, 1996) and the siblings in Laura Numeroff's Chicken Sisters (HarperCollins, 1997).-Carol Ann Wilson, Westfield Memorial Library, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.