Cover image for Raccoon
Title:
Raccoon
Author:
Jacobs, Lee.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Blackbirch Press ; The Gale Group, inc., a division of Thomson Learning Inc., [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
24 pages : color illustrations ; 20 x 24 cm.
Summary:
Examines the raccoon's environment, anatomy, social life, mating, babies, and encounters with humans.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.1 0.5 62968.
ISBN:
9781567116441
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
Home Location
Status
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL737.C26 J33 2002 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

The name "raccoon" comes from an Algonquin Indian word that means, "he scratches with his hands." This is a perfect name for a creature that can use its nimble hands to climb, dig, catch fish, or even untie a rope or open a refrigerator!


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. Giraffes is part of the Wild Africa series. Raccoon is part of the Wild America series. They have exactly the same attractive, compact photo-essay design, with big color pictures and detailed text on every page. They work very well together, but, of course, each title stands alone: the towering giraffe in central and southern Africa and the small raccoon commonly found in backyards in the U.S. may both be wild animals, but they are different in where and how they live and in their relations with humans. The Leesons' photographs in Giraffes are splendid, with close-up views (including one showing two giraffes rubbing their necks together in a kind of hug) as well as pictures of the tallest of all land creatures loping across the grassland. In Raccoon the photos are from several sources, and some text is printed on the photos, which makes it hard to read. Both books are packed with information in short chapters on the animals' social lives, anatomy, feeding, mating, and more. Other titles in both series are listed in the Series Roundup in this issue. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-3-Attractive in design and layout, these books are sure to spark the interest of young nature enthusiasts. The colorful covers feature a photograph of the subject's face and sample paw prints. Readers learn about the animal's habitat, physical and behavioral traits, special features, mating and familial practices, and human/animal interactions. Each topical spread includes text and two to four full-color photos, many of which were taken at close range. Children will enjoy reading these titles for pleasure, and will use them for reports.-Cathie Bashaw Morton, Somers Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.