Cover image for Hand-print animal art
Title:
Hand-print animal art
Author:
Carreiro, Carolyn, 1961-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Charlotte, Vt. : Williamson Pub. Co., [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
144 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 x 28 cm
Summary:
Provides directions for creating paintings of all kinds of birds, wildlife, and sea creatures using your fingers and hands.
General Note:
"A Williamson kids can! book"--Cover.

Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781885593092
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
ND2490 .C37 1997 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

For ages 4 to 8 years. As unique as fingerprints, hand-print art is the ultimate in self-expression. Every child's natural instinct is to stick a whole hand in a plate of paint. Add an array of paint colours, visions of real animals or those drawn in their imaginations, and creativity explodes in a burst of colour and fun! Make simple palm-out prints of a silly frog, delicate fingertip points of a giraffe, and N a spectacular, colourful peacock print. Over 60 active-learning experiences explore the unique world of fish, fowl, beasts, pets, and insects. Hand-print techniques show how to create special effects using outstretched fingers, cupped hands, pinky fingerprints, smudged thumbprints, flat-fingered ridges, and much more. Hand-Print Animal Art is designed for children aged four to ten -- and their families! Carolyn Carreiro has had a lifelong interest in working with children. As a teacher, she realises that kids of all ages gravitate to hand-print art for creative expression.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5‘A craft book that presents detailed instructions for 63 animals, along with full-color pictures that show the finished projects. The basic shapes are created by putting paint on one's hands and stamping them on paper. Details are added with fingertips and or fine-line markers. Bits of scientific information and suggestions for experiments or other activities appear on the pages facing the directions. While the art projects are fun and stimulating, this peripheral material is dull and extraneous. Children who love Ed Emberley's thumbprint books will enjoy this extension of that concept. In addition to those drawing guides, a general title such as Sara Lynn and Diane James's Play with Paint (Carolrhoda, 1992) is recommended for ideas on encouraging creativity.‘Jean Pollock, King Country Library System, Seattle, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.