Cover image for Sleeping tiger
Title:
Sleeping tiger
Author:
Pilcher, Rosamunde.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, [1996]

[©1967]
Physical Description:
280 pages ; 17 cm
General Note:
"St. Martin's Paperbacks editions."
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780312961251
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

When you read a novel by Rosamunde Pilcher you enter a special world where emotions sing from the heart. A world that lovingly captures the ties that bind us to one another-the joys and sorrows, heartbreaks and misunderstandings, and glad, perfect moments when we are in true harmony. A world filled with evocative, engrossing, and above all, enjoyable portraits of people's lives and loves, tenderly laid open for us...

Whenever Selina asked about her late father, the grandmother who raised her changed the subject. The chance discovery of a photograph gave Selina hope that he was still alive and sent her searching for him on a small Spanish island. In this lush paradise, Selina found George Dyer, a writer who would help her solve the mystery of her past...and might hold the key to her future.


Author Notes

English romance novelist and short story writer Rosamunde Pilcher was born in Lelant, in Cornwall, England. The daughter of a Royal Navy commander, she was educated at public schools in both England and Wales, and served in the Women's Royal Naval Service from 1942 to 1946. After leaving the Naval Service, she married Graham Hope Pilcher in December 1946.

Pilcher was interested in writing from an early age, and was encouraged by her parents to pursue this interest. At age 16 she submitted a short story to the editor of three women's magazines. Though the story was rejected, the editor told her to keep trying. This contact led to the publication of another story a short time later. She then began a successful career writing what she describes as "sort of mimsy little love stories" under the pseudonym Jane Fraser. Her first novel, Halfway to the Moon (1949), was published under that name, and for a number of years she continued to write under that name as well as her own.

Pilcher specializes in "light reading for intelligent ladies," as she has stated in an interview in Publishers Weekly. The author of over 20 novels, she has also written numerous short stories, many of which have appeared in Good Housekeeping magazine. One of Pilcher's longest and most complex novels, as well as one of her most popular works, is The Shell Seekers (1988). The novel focuses on Penelope Keeling, an independent, slightly offbeat woman who recalls, through flashbacks, her idyllic childhood in Cornwall, her hasty wartime marriage, and her troubled relationship with two of her three children. Now settled in a country cottage filled with reminders of her past, Penelope draws strength and comfort from these mementos, especially a painting entitled "The Shell Seekers," which was painted by her father. Although not autobiographical, the novel loosely parallels Pilcher's own life in a number of ways. Other works include Sleeping Tiger (1967), The End of the Summer (1971), Wild Mountain Thyme (1979), and Voices in Summer (1982).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Pilcher is known for her warm, compassionate tales of English family life. But this 1967 novella, available on audio for the first time, is not one of her better efforts. An orphan brought up by her maternal grandmother, 20-year-old Selena has always wondered about her never-mentioned father. Her only link to him is a photograph, and when she spots, on the back of a book jacket, an author photo with an uncanny resemblance to her father, she impetuously takes off for Spain to find him. Selena's extreme navet becomes irritating after a while, and suspenseful and comic moments seem forced and drawn out. Narrator Carey excels at voicing the many quarrels in this book, easily switching from Selena's high-pitched, protesting voice to an exasperated male tone. Unfortunately, she has no facility for accents. She's fine for the Brits: Selena, her fianc, the author Selena suspects is her father. But much of the action takes place on an island off the coast of Spain, and Carey's Spanish accent for the supporting characters is simply not credible. An American character, too, sounds anything but American. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved