Cover image for Koyaanisqatsi
Title:
Koyaanisqatsi
Author:
Coppola, Francis Ford, 1939-
Uniform Title:
Koyaanisqatsi (Motion picture)
Publication Information:
Santa Monica, CA : MGM Home Entertainment, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (86 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Koyaanisqatsi is a Hopi Indian word meaning variously: crazy life, life in turmoil, life disintegrating, life out of balance (the subtitle for this film), and a state of life that calls for another way of life. This film presents a concert of visual images set to the music of Philip Glass that progresses from purely natural environments to nature as affected by man, and finally to man's own man made environment that is devoid of nature.
General Note:
Originally produced as a motion picture in 1983.

Special features: "Essence of life", interview with Reggio & Glass (c2002, 25 min.); theatrical trailer (2 min.).

"Enhanced for widescreen TVs"--Container.

First film in the Qatsi trilogy.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Not rated by the MPAA.
Added Title:
Essence of life.
ISBN:
9780792853336
UPC:
027616878939
Format :
DVD

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
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Status
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DVD 4462 Adult DVD Open Shelf
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CB478 .K69 2002V Adult DVD Central Library
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CB478 .K69 2002 Adult DVD Audio Visual
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CB478 .K69 2002 Adult DVD Open Shelf
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CB478 .K69 2002 Adult DVD Audio Visual
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CB478 .K69 2002 Adult DVD Audio Visual
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On Order

Summary

Summary

An art-house circuit sensation, this feature-length documentary is visually arresting and possesses a clear, pro-environmental political agenda. Without a story, dialogue, or characters, Koyaanisqatsi (1983) (the film's title is a Hopi word roughly translated into English as "life out of balance") is composed of nature imagery, manipulated in slow motion, double exposure or time lapse, juxtaposed with footage of humans' devastating environmental impact on the planet. Starting with an ancient rock wall painting, the film moves through sequences depicting clouds, waves, and other natural features, then into man-made landscapes such as buildings, earth-altering construction machinery, and cars. The message of director Godfrey Reggio is clear: humans are destroying the planet, and all of human progress is pointlessly foolish. Also notable for its intense, atmospheric score by new age composer Philip Glass, Koyaanisqatsi (1983) was a labor of love for Reggio, who spent several years filming it. The film was followed by sequels, Powaqqatsi (1988), Anima Mundi (1991) and Naqoyqatsi (1999). ~ Karl Williams, Rovi