Cover image for Dear Ichiro
Title:
Dear Ichiro
Author:
Okimoto, Jean Davies.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Seattle, Wash. : Kumagai Press, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
After fighting with his best friend and vowing to hate him forever, eight-year-old Henry attends a Seattle Mariners baseball game, where his great-grandfather explains that enemies can sometimes become friends again.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.4 0.5 124353.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781570613739
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Eight-year-old Henry and his friend Oliver are having a fight. When Henry gets a time-out, he wishes Oliver would get one too -- for life. "I hate Oliver," he says. "He's my enemy. I'll hate him forever." The day takes a turn when Grampa Charlie takes Henry to a baseball game. Charlie, a World War II veteran, cheers on the Seattle Mariners' Ichiro Suzuki and Kazuhiro Sasaki, and his enthusiasm for the Japanese players paves the way for Henry and Oliver's reconciliation. In the tradition of Baseball Saved Us, Jean Davies Okimoto's heartwarming story and Doug Keith's whimsical illustrations offer a message of hope.


Author Notes

Jean Davies Okimoto is an author and playwright whose books and short stories have been translated into Japanese, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German and Hebrew. She is the recipient of numerous awards including Smithsonian Notable Book, the American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults, the Washington Governor's Award, and the International Reading Association Readers Choice Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

K^-Gr. 2. Red-haired Henry and his curly-topped friend Oliver are messing around in Henry's room when Oliver spills grape drink on the stuffie Henry still sleeps with and then compounds the damage by dropping it in the toilet. Now Oliver is Henry's enemy. Then Henry and his great-grandpa, Charlie, head off to a Mariners game where they cheer outfielder Ichiro and the pitcher Kazuhiro Sasaki, and Grampa explains how amazing it is to be rooting for Japanese players. Long ago, when Grampa Charlie was in the army, he thought Americans and Japanese would be enemies forever. Henry and Grampa talk about how enemies can get to be friends, and Henry thinks about how maybe he and Oliver could be friends again, even writing a letter to Ichiro, explaining his hopes for getting along with Oliver just like baseball players from different countries can play together. The story is heavy on the message, but it also lightly conveys a certain amount about history and good behavior. Keith's bright, realistic illustrations capture the boys, their family relationships, and baseball with shining energy. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-When Henry squabbles with his best friend, Oliver is sent home and Henry is absolutely convinced he will never play with him again. That afternoon, Henry's great-grandfather takes him to a Seattle Mariners baseball game. When team members Ichiro Suzuki and Kazuhiro Sasaki appear on the field, Grampa Charlie cheers along with the crowd. However, he also recalls fighting against the Japanese in World War II and marvels at the positive changes he could never have anticipated all those years ago. Henry applies his grandfather's thoughts about war and reconciliation to his friendship with Oliver and writes a letter to Suzuki sharing his grandfather's ideas. While the message of forgive and forget is the principal point of the story, it is delivered with innocent appeal. Brightly colored illustrations capture the boys' anger as well as the excitement of an afternoon at the ballpark. The introduction of actual baseball players adds authenticity, and notes provide a brief history of the emergence of baseball in Japan and the arrival of Japanese players on the American scene.-Alicia Eames, New York City Public Schools (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.