Cover image for Solaris
Title:
Solaris
Author:
Lem, Stanisław.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Solaris. English
Publication Information:
San Diego : Harcourt Brace & Company, [2002]

©1970
Physical Description:
204 pages ; 21 cm
General Note:
Reprint. Originally published: New York : Walker, 1970.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780156027601
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

"A fantastic book." --Steven Soderbergh

When psychologist Kris Kelvin arrives at the planet Solaris to study the ocean that covers its surface, he finds himself confronting a painful memory embodied in the physical likeness of a past lover. Kelvin learns that he is not alone in this and that other crews examining the planet are plagued with their own repressed and newly real memories. Could it be, as Solaris scientists speculate, that the ocean may be a massive neural center creating these memories, for a reason no one can identify?

Long considered a classic, Solaris asks the question: Can we understand the universe around us without first understanding what lies within?

"A novel that makes you reevaluate the nature of intelligence itself." --Anne McCaffrey


Author Notes

Polish science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem was born on September 12, 1921. A medical graduate of Cracow University, he is at home both in the sciences and in philosophy, and this broad erudition gives his writings genuine depth. He has published extensively, not only fiction, but also theoretical studies. His books have been translated into 41 languages and sold over 27 million copies. He gained international acclaim for The Cyberiad, a series of short stories, which was first published in 1974. A trend toward increasingly serious philosophical speculation is found in his later works, such as Solaris (1961), which was made into a Soviet film by Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky in 1972 and remade by Steven Soderbergh in 2002. He died on March 27, 2006 in Krakow at the age of 84.

(Bowker Author Biography)