Cover image for Dog days
Title:
Dog days
Author:
Harvey, Amanda.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Random House Children's Books, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : chiefly color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
When a new kitten joins the family, Otis the dog feels neglected and must learn to adjust.
General Note:
"A Doubleday book for young readers."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780385746212

9780385908603
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

What do they want a kitten for? That's what Otis thinks when a meowing fluff balls enters his home. All too quickly, Otis feels neglected. So he sets off on his own. But the day turns out to be long and hot. . . .


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 1. In this companion to Dog Eared (2002), sibling rivalry rears its ugly head when the family gets a new kitten, which leaves long-eared mutt Otis feeling very left out. Suddenly, Lucy and her sister forget to feed him, and no one shakes out his bed or brushes his fur. So Otis takes off on his own--rifling through garbage cans, chasing cats, and scouting about for prospective new owners--until he realizes how much he misses Lucy and runs back to her welcoming arms. Succinct text and colorful illustrations make this an ideal choice for story hours. Harvey's cheerful watercolor artwork captures a wide range of emotions, especially in Otis, as he works through his feelings toward the feline intruder. The target audience may be too young to relate Otis' dilemma to their own family situations, but they will certainly empathize with this appealing canine and take comfort in his secure place in the family. For a different approach to dog-cat relationships, pull out Lyn Rossiter McFarland's Widget (2001). Kay Weisman


Publisher's Weekly Review

Self-conscious Otis, whose long ears were a source of chagrin in Dog-Eared, now has a rival for his owners' affection: a gray kitten. The spotted hound watches his best friend Lucy and her little sister "fussing over this meowing fluff ball.... The kitten this. The kitten that. I was forgotten." With his plastic dish empty and his fur uncombed, Otis takes to raiding trash cans and chasing cats: "I decided to roam the streets. Doing the things I'm not normally allowed to do. It was a good morning." Otis's matter-of-fact voice lends dignity to his galumphing, brown-and-white-spotted mutt's body. Yet his deadpan statements cannot be mistaken for indifference. His longing for Lucy comes through in his faraway eyes and worried questions: "Was she managing without me?" After choosing a suitable new family at the city park and bunking in a friendly family's laundry room, the runaway bounds home and into Lucy's arms at last. Harvey's delicate watercolor-and-pencil compositions, which give the characters' ears and hair a breezy weightlessness, show that Otis never strays far from his own neighborhood. Lucy-parent-style-doesn't admit she ignored Otis for the kitten, but she cultivates his forgiveness by reading him a book and giving him a hug. With any luck, there will be more dramas to come for these two and their growing family. Ages 3-6. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Poor Otis feels so ignored when Lucy brings home a kitten that he runs away and, when he reaches the park, considers joining another family. Full-page, full-color cartoon illustrations show the potential animal and owner groups: a poodle-haired woman and her look-alike pet; a large-bellied man and his large-bellied pups; and tartan-clad, well-groomed dogs. Passing a familiar house, Otis decides to stay there but as night falls, he thinks of Lucy and runs home to her warm embrace. Settling down for the night, he thinks of the fun he will have showing the kitten his tricks. Otis's experiences seem contrived to provide the author/illustrator an opportunity for visual humor. Still, the pup is appealing and his story will attract pet lovers and fans of Harvey's Dog Eared (Doubleday, 2002). While Gene Zion's Harry the Dirty Dog (HarperCollins, 1956) is a better treatment of the theme, most children will enjoy meeting Otis as well.-Louise L. Sherman, formerly at Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.