Cover image for The rage and the pride
Title:
The rage and the pride
Author:
Fallaci, Oriana.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Rabbia e l'orgoglio. English
Publication Information:
New York : Rizzoli, 2002.

©2001
Physical Description:
187 pages ; 21 cm
General Note:
Originally published as: La rabbia e l'orgoglio. Milan : Rizzoli, 2001.
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780847825042
Format :
Book

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PN4874.F38 A313 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The Italian-born journalist offers her reactions to the events of September 11, 2001, and her views on America, Italy, Europe, Islam and Western civilization, and related topics, interspersed with personal memories.


Author Notes

A prize-winning novelist and journalist, Oriana Fallaci is known primarily for her controversial interviews. She has spoken unabashedly, if not abrasively, with such world figures as Henry Kissinger, Willy Brandt, the Ayatollah Khomeini, Yasir Arafat, the Shah of Iran, Indira Ghandi, and Golda Meir. Her bold, often brilliant, interviewing technique is characterized by brutal frankness, as when she challenged Henry Kissinger to "talk about war."

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Noted Italian journalist Fallaci (Interview with History; etc.) is capable of hard-hitting, trenchant social criticism, but she fails to accomplish that in this impassioned but sloppy post-September 11 critique, which has been a bestseller in Italy and elsewhere in Europe. Fallaci only aggravates her lack of rigorous thinking by translating the work herself, resulting in a clumsy text that appears not to have been edited or proofread by a fluent English speaker. (Whatever resonance "cicada"-her choice term for the "so-called intellectuals" whom she addresses-has in Italian fails to translate into English.) After a melodramatic preface in which Fallaci congratulates herself on her courage in speaking the truth (and in her defense, apparently there have been efforts to ban the book in France), she lights into the European, and especially Italian, "cicadas" who felt that, on September 11, 2001, America got what she had coming to her and who, in the name of political correctness, fail to condemn the "Reverse Crusade" being waged by Islamic zealots like Osama bin Laden. But Fallaci's love for America, her adopted home, and her critique of European intellectuals' perverse contempt for it, is laced with a bile that may lead readers to suspect her of anti-Arab bias-a possibility she is all to aware of, repeatedly defending herself against the charge of racism. Fallaci's "Italy for Italians" diatribe, her ugly portrait of Muslim immigrants as invading and violating her native Florence ("Terrorists, thieves, rapists. Ex-convicts, prostitutes, beggars. Drug-dealers, contagiously ill"), her denial that there is a moderate Islam, will not sit well with American readers, who may wonder why this small book has, in the publisher's words, "causeda turmoil never registered in decades" in Italy, France and Spain. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved