Cover image for The literary werewolf : an anthology
Title:
The literary werewolf : an anthology
Author:
Otten, Charlotte F.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Syracuse : Syracuse University Press, 2002.
Physical Description:
xxxii, 295 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
February, cycle of the werewolf / Stephen King -- Eena / Manly Banister -- The were-wolf / Clemence Housman -- The wolf / Guy de Maupassant -- Gabriel-Ernest / Saki -- The thing in the fog / Seabury Quinn -- The werewolves of London / Brian Stableford -- The door of the unreal / Gerald Biss -- The mark of the beast / Rudyard Kipling -- The hound / Fritz Leiber -- The woman at Loon Point / August W. Derleth and Mark Schorer -- The werewolf / Eugene Field -- The kill / Peter Fleming -- The lay of the were-wolf / Marie de France -- The story of Rough Niall of the speckled rock / Joseph Jacobs -- Lycaon's punishment / Ovid -- The bitang / Mihai I. Spariosu and Dezso Benedek -- The phantom farmhouse / Seabury Quinn -- Running wolf / Algernon Blackwood -- The she-wolf / Saki -- Green messiah / Jane Yolen -- Wolves don't cry / Bruce Elliott.
Subject Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780815629658

9780815607533
Format :
Book

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PN6120.95.W47 L58 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

A werewolf anthology that covers new terrain. Its stories span centuries. Its storytellers, from Stephen King to Saki, de Maupassant to Kipling, Seabury Quinn to Ovid, are eclectic. Its premise delves deep into its subject.


Summary

A werewolf anthology that covers new terrain. Its stories span centuries. Its storytellers, from Stephen King to Saki, de Maupassant to Kipling, Seabury Quinn to Ovid, are eclectic. Its premise delves deep into its subject.


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

The Literary Werewolf, edited by scholar Charlotte F. Otten, collects 22 werewolf tales from Ovid to Stephen King, whose "February, Cycle of the Werewolf" leads off the opening section, "The Erotic Werewolf." Other categories include the "Diabolical," the "Victimized," the "Guilty" and the "Voluntary" werewolf. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Compiled by Otten, editor of A Lycanthropy Reader: Werewolves in Western Culture, the 22 tales in this engaging collection range from the ancient world (Ovid's "Lyacaon's Punishment") to the modern age (Stephen King's "February, Cycle of the Werewolf"). There is a tantalizing excerpt of Brian Stableford's novel, The Werewolves of London, in which fallen angels from biblical times roam the world as werewolves. Seabury Quinn's "The Thing in the Fog" is reminiscent of Bram Stoker's Dracula, except that here the evil one who attempts to seduce and transform a lovely young woman is a werewolf rather than a vampire. The main character in Bruce Elliott's amusing "Wolves Don't Cry" is a wolf in a zoo who wakes up one morning as a man. In Jane Yolen's "Green Messiah," a group of environmentalists finds a way to repopulate the wolf species-by turning humans into wolves. Other featured storytellers include Saki, Guy de Maupassant, and Rudyard Kipling. Readers of good fiction will find this volume worthwhile. For both literary and horror collections.-Patricia Altner, Information Seekers, Columbia, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

The Literary Werewolf, edited by scholar Charlotte F. Otten, collects 22 werewolf tales from Ovid to Stephen King, whose "February, Cycle of the Werewolf" leads off the opening section, "The Erotic Werewolf." Other categories include the "Diabolical," the "Victimized," the "Guilty" and the "Voluntary" werewolf. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Compiled by Otten, editor of A Lycanthropy Reader: Werewolves in Western Culture, the 22 tales in this engaging collection range from the ancient world (Ovid's "Lyacaon's Punishment") to the modern age (Stephen King's "February, Cycle of the Werewolf"). There is a tantalizing excerpt of Brian Stableford's novel, The Werewolves of London, in which fallen angels from biblical times roam the world as werewolves. Seabury Quinn's "The Thing in the Fog" is reminiscent of Bram Stoker's Dracula, except that here the evil one who attempts to seduce and transform a lovely young woman is a werewolf rather than a vampire. The main character in Bruce Elliott's amusing "Wolves Don't Cry" is a wolf in a zoo who wakes up one morning as a man. In Jane Yolen's "Green Messiah," a group of environmentalists finds a way to repopulate the wolf species-by turning humans into wolves. Other featured storytellers include Saki, Guy de Maupassant, and Rudyard Kipling. Readers of good fiction will find this volume worthwhile. For both literary and horror collections.-Patricia Altner, Information Seekers, Columbia, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.