Cover image for Cuban fire : the saga of salsa and Latin jazz
Title:
Cuban fire : the saga of salsa and Latin jazz
Author:
Leymarie, Isabelle.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Cuban fire. English
Publication Information:
London ; New York : Continuum, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
vi, 394 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
General Note:
Translation of: Cuban fire : musiques populaires d'expression cubaine.
Language:
English
Contents:
The roots -- From African liturgies to Creole rhythms -- The 1920s and 1930s: son, rumba, and conga -- Havana and Cuba -- The United States and Puerto Rico -- The 1940s and 1950s: the golden age of Cuban music -- Havana and Cuba -- The United States and Puerto Rico -- The 1960s: the pachanga, the boogaloo, and Latin soul -- Havana and Cuba -- The United States and Puerto Rico -- From the 1970s until today: advent of the songo -- Havana and Cuba -- The United States and Puerto Rico -- The rest of the world -- Conclusion.
ISBN:
9780826455864
Format :
Book

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ML3486.C8 L313 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

This title tells the saga of popular music of Cuban origin, and its major artists from the 1920s to today. Afro-Cuban music derives its richness from the fusion of various cultures. On the island of tobacco, rum and coffee, the marriage of sacred and secular African musical genres with Spanish and French melodies has given rise to numerous genres which have gained international fame: son, rhumba, guaracha, conga, mambo, cha-cha-cha, pachanga, nueva timba. In the US, Cubans have settled alongside other Hispanic communities. In New York, the boogaloo, salsa and Latin jazz, created by musicians such as Machito, Dizzy Gillespie and Chano Pozo emerged from contact with Puerto Ricans and African-Americans, and the rhythms of Puerto Rico and Santo Domingo were integrated into salsa and Latin jazz.


Author Notes

Authors Bio, not available


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Cuba's unique blend of African, Spanish, and French cultures has produced an international musical legacy of unparalleled popularity. An award-winning author and a documentary filmmaker, Leymarie traces the history of Cuban music and its major artists from the 1920s to today with ardor and verve. Sections on musical roots, the 1940s and 1950s ("The golden age of Cuban music"), the 1970s to today, and more describe the development of distinct genres like the rumba, conga, and pachanga in Cuba, as well as in expatriate communities in the United States and Puerto Rico. Other recent excellent books on Cuban music include Sue Steward's -Musica!: The Rhythm of Latin America; Salsa, Rumba, Merengue, and More, which is more of a coffee-table book (but with a good discography) and doesn't quite match Cuban Fire's scholarly, sequential style. Scott Yanow's Afro-Cuban Jazz is reasonably scholarly, but the scope is not as broad. Cuban Fire occupies the middle ground between those two otherwise terrific books and is the one to choose if you can't afford all three. Essential wherever books on popular music are collected.-Dave Valencia, King Cty. Lib. Syst., Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 1
Acknowledgmentsp. 6
I The roots
1 From African liturgies to Creole rhythmsp. 9
Sacred musicp. 9
Traditional secular musicp. 18
The clavep. 37
Rhythm instrumentsp. 39
II The 1920s and 1930s: son, rumba, and conga
2 Havana and Cubap. 44
Emergence of the Havana sonp. 50
The rise of charangas, the bolero, and the guajirap. 68
The beginnings of jazzp. 78
3 The United States and Puerto Ricop. 83
The awakening of the Barriop. 85
Music in Puerto Ricop. 98
III The 1940s and 1950s: the golden age of Cuban music
4 Havana and Cubap. 108
From nuevo ritmo to cha-cha: the great charangasp. 111
Updating the sonp. 121
Big bands, combos, and descargasp. 130
Singers in Cubap. 142
5 The United States and Puerto Ricop. 157
Que rico el mambo!p. 158
The Afro-Cubansp. 165
Tito Puente, Tito Rodriguez, and other Latin bandsp. 174
Singers in the U.S. and Puerto Ricop. 186
Chano Pozo and his disciplesp. 189
Expansion of Latin jazzp. 199
IV The 1960s: the pachanga, the boogaloo, and Latin soul
6 Havana and Cubap. 208
The explosion of rhythmsp. 210
7 The United States and Puerto Ricop. 216
The pachanga and the boogaloo erap. 216
Emergence of charangasp. 228
Revival of the bomba and the plenap. 232
Latin jazz and Latin soulp. 238
V From the 1970s until today: advent of the songo
8 Havana and Cubap. 244
Traditional musicp. 245
The songo and charangasp. 247
The sonp. 250
The nueva timbap. 253
The Buena Vista Social Club phenomenonp. 256
Latin jazzp. 258
Other bandsp. 265
Vocalistsp. 265
9 The United States and Puerto Ricop. 267
Instrumental salsap. 267
The salsa vocalistsp. 289
Salsa in Puerto Rico, California, and Floridap. 297
The merenguep. 306
New horizons for Latin jazzp. 315
Latin rock and Latin discop. 326
10 The rest of the worldp. 329
Influence of Cuban and Puerto Rican music abroadp. 329
VI Conclusionp. 341
Glossaryp. 343
Interviewsp. 348
Discographyp. 360
Bibliographyp. 365
Indexp. 370