Cover image for Picasso's war the destruction of Guernica and the masterpiece that changed the world
Title:
Picasso's war the destruction of Guernica and the masterpiece that changed the world
Author:
Martin, Russell.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
St. Paul, MN : Highbridge Audio, [2002]

â„—2002
Physical Description:
6 audio discs (7 3/4 hrs.) digital, stereophonic ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
On April 26, 1937, the Basque town of Guernica in northern Spain was bombed by Hitler's Luftwaffe in the midst of a bloody civil war on behalf of Francisco Franco's rebel forces. Twenty-four hours later, the village lay in ruins, its population decimated. This act of terror and unspeakable cruelty outraged the world, and one man in particular, Pablo Picasso, and expatriate living in Paris, responded to the devastation in his homeland by creating Guernica, a painting that many today consider the greatedst artwork of the 20th century.
General Note:
Compact discs.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781565117235
UPC:
9781565117235

2502489183
Format :
Audiobook on CD

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ND553.P5 A66 2002D Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

On April 26, 1937, the Basque town of Guernica in northern Spain was bombed by Hitler's Luftwaffe in the midst of a bloody civil war on behalf of Francisco Franco's rebel forces. Twenty-four hours later, the village lay in ruins, its population decimated.This act of terror and unspeakable cruelty--the first large-scale attack against civilians in modern warfare--outraged the world, and one man in particular. Pablo Picasso, and expatriate living in Paris, responded to the devastation in his homeland by creating Guernica, a painting that many today consider the greatest artwork of the 20th century.Weaving themes of politics, art, war, and morality, and spotlighting some of the 20th century's most memorable and infamous figures, Russell Martin follows this renowned masterwork across decades and continents. From Europe to America and finally back to Spain, Picasso's War sheds light on the conflict that was an ominous prelude to World War II and delivers a vivid portrait of a genius whose visionary statement about the horror and terrible wounds of war still resonates today.


Summary

On April 26, 1937, the Basque town of Guernica in northern Spain was bombed by Hitler's Luftwaffe in the midst of a bloody civil war on behalf of Francisco Franco's rebel forces. Twenty-four hours later, the village lay in ruins, its population decimated. This act of terror and unspeakable cruelty outraged the world, and Pablo Picasso who created Guernica, a painting that many today consider the greatest artwork of the 20th century.


Author Notes

Russell Martin is the author of five works of nonfiction, including the highly acclaimed Out of Silence, and a novel. He lives in Colorado.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

"Painting is not done to decorate apartments. It is an instrument of war." So said Spaniard Pablo Picasso, who created the famous painting Guernica during the Spanish Civil War in reaction to the Nazis' bombing of the Basque village of the same name. Guernica is widely regarded as the best known work of anti-war visual art ever made. Wyman takes a friendly, straightforward approach to reading Martin's historical and personal account of the life of the massive painting, reminiscent of a favorite college professor. His occasional accents work more as an indication of a change of speaker rather than as convincing characters, but his enthusiasm for this saga of art, politics and tragedy makes it a winning performance. The story of Guernica's life after its creation is as fascinating as the events that inspired it are horrific. After the painting received much criticism when it was first exhibited in Paris in 1937, the world later deemed it a masterpiece. New York's Museum of Modern Art kept it safe from the political turmoil in Spain for decades until it was finally demanded back in the 1980s. In 2001, when Martin (Beethoven's Hair) finally saw the work-a monument to the horrors of war-he was told by a stranger that he should get to a television. It was September 11. Martin is now speaking publicly about the parallels between the "terror and unspeakable cruelty" of September 11 and Guernica, making this a surprisingly timely audiobook. Based on the Dutton hardcover (Forecasts, Aug. 26, 2002). (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved