Cover image for The first advent
Title:
The first advent
Author:
Stancliff, Lloyd.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Ref. 3/21/01.
Publication Information:
[United States] : 1st Books Library, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
110 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
A re-telling of the account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ.
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780759605060
Format :
Book

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BT301 .S63 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The new Christianity. A mind awakening and revealing account of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ. A retelling of the gospel story with a viewpoint never before presented. It is a version of the Bible that makes Jesus so real readers will feel they can reach out and touch him. A story that sweeps away the shroud of mystery and presents clear insight into the gospel and into coming events. This book has the ability to change the face of both Christianity and Judaism. A must read for anyone attempting to receive a closer relationship with their Christ and with their Creator.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter 1 Jerusalem was a conquered city. There were few to pity the captured vanquished. The city was old even by standards of the time. It had seen armies come and go, the great and the small, leaving behind ashes, crumbled walls and the dead. Yet in an almost hurried fashion, the Israelites, who were a stiff-necked people, rebuilt anew on top of the old. No one ever knew how many cities were buried in the countless layers of strata, for their scribes and their scrolls were also contained therein. Rome had been a cruel taskmaster. Its edicts governed daily life and all commerce, ever demanding impeccable obedience. As was the custom, procurators were assigned. Pontius Pilate had been placed over Judea, Samaria, and Idomaria. Herod Antipas, the second son of Herod the Great, was the Tetrarch of Galilee and Perea. It was his father who, by Roman decree, had received the title King of the Jews. In desperation, Herod Antipas, ordered that the sons of Bethlehem two years and younger, be put to death to insure that he might retain his throne. Having been a believer of Jewish prophecy, he sought to kill a child who was destined to be King of the Jews. It was also he who had rebuilt the Jewish temple in an attempt to increase his popularity. Distant sounds of the shofar summoning ancient tribes of their ancestors to assemble were still discernible to seasoned ears. The sounds of the shofar served as a sad reminder of the loss of King David and Solomon, Rehoboam and Jehosophat and their days of glory. Thus, it became the custom for people to rend their garments each day upon awakening to display their anguish. Prayer and devotion became their habit while they longed for prophecy as if it were their final hope. They cried for a Deliverer, the Anointed One of Jehovah, God of their ancestors, to redeem them from the hands of their oppressors, and never again to be left alone outside His grace or to bend beneath the yoke of their enemies. Never again to find a barrenness at the holy mountain or to hunger from a beggar man's portion of bread. Excerpted from The First Advent by Lloyd Stancliff All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.