Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PS374.P63 S45 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

From the early days of dime novels to contemporary mass-market paperbacks, pulp fiction is a vital part of popular culture. This volume offers a survey of the scores of well-known and unsung heroes of popular literature. It seeks to cover the entire spectrum of pop literature's greatest entertainers and artists; the multimillion-copy bestsellers; and the inventors of the modern genres, such as the western, the hardboiled detective novel, the spy thriller, science fiction, horror, the legal thriller, crime fiction and the erotic/romance novel. The work also profiles colourful but lesser-known underground figures, as well as a wide variety of talented paperback authors who were never given their due. Each of the 200 entries includes a brief biography along with a list of the author's writing credits.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Written by established pulp fiction and popular culture author Server, Encyclopedia of Pulp Fiction Writers includes information on more than 200 nineteenth-and twentieth-century writers. Arranged in alphabetical order, each entry includes a biographical sketch and list of the author's works (arranged by pseudonym). Also included is an introduction that serves as a concise overview and traces the start of the industry of pulp serials to the genre that it is today. Rather than being comprehensive, the encyclopedia aims to provide "a representative sampling," and in some cases leaves out better-known and widely covered writers in favor of others who are more obscure. Among the names one will find here are James M. Cain, Zane Grey, Mary Roberts Rinehart, Mickey Spillane, and Jacqueline Susann. Approximately 30 percent of the writers do not appear in other author sources like Contemporary Popular Writers (St. James, 1997), and for those who do, the emphasis is often not on any contributions to pulp fiction. Many authors who have become mainstream, such as Edgar Rice Burroughs and Ian Fleming, are included, and their humble beginnings are the focus of these articles. Some readers may be miffed to discover that their favorite (and often best-selling) authors--such as Tom Clancy and Mario Puzo--are identified with the pulp genre, but Server makes a good argument for inclusion. Encyclopedia of Pulp Fiction Writers fills a niche in sourcebooks on authors and is recommended for libraries with large literature criticism collections.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Those who spent their formative years engrossed in the works of V.C. Andrews, Mickey Spillane or Harold Robbins (when they should have been reading Silas Marner for English class) will delight in this comprehensive resource on the virtuosos of genre fiction. Server (Over My Dead Body), who writes about pop culture and literary history and is a stone-cold expert on pulps, offers encyclopedia-style biographical entries on legendary writers in all of the mass market categories: westerns, horror, science fiction, detective stories and romances. Entries include the usual suspects, such as H.P. Lovecraft, Louis L'Amour, Ian Fleming, Mario Puzo and Jacqueline Susann, as well as more unlikely names: Baroness Emmuska Orczy (the Hungarian refugee who wrote The Adventures of the Scarlet Pimpernel), John Faulkner (the less successful sibling of you-know-who, whose 1951 Cabin Road is about the ribald shenanigans of Mississippi hicks), Achmed Abdullah (the Russian-born, Afghanistan-raised, Oxford-educated author of spy thrillers and gritty New York Chinatown noirs-The Honorable Gentleman and Other Stories, etc.-in the 1920s and 1930s). The biographies themselves make for engrossing reading, as Server describes how Bruno Fisher came to write his "weird menace" supernatural pulps while working as the editor of the Socialist Call, or why Chester Himes turned from social novels to detective fiction (he was broke). A bibliography follows each entry, and Server includes an introduction that describes the rise of cheaply bound sensational fiction in the 19th century. Numerous b&w photos enliven the text even further. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This comprehensive reference by Server, author of the acclaimed Danger Is My Business: The Illustrated History of the Fabulous Pulp Magazines and coeditor of The Big Book of Noir, profiles famous and lesser-known writers of pulp fiction, the popular novels (originally published on cheap wood pulp paper) that flourished in the 1860s to 1950s and included Westerns, mysteries, crime, science fiction, horror, and erotic thrillers. Server emphasizes how the writing has adjusted to changes in society and the marketplace, closely reflecting the predominant cultural mores. Each of the 200 entries, covering pulp fiction writers of the past century, range from less than a page to two pages and includes a brief biography along with a list of writing credits. There are 50 black-and-white photographs and a useful index. Server presents a clever sampling of writers, and interesting tidbits abound, e.g., some of the best-known writers got their start writing pulp fiction, including Raymond Chandler, Earl Stanley Gardner, Max Brand, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Ian Fleming, and Mario Puzo. Public, high school, and college libraries will find this resource affordable and useful for their literature and pop culture collections.-Bobbie Wrinkle, McCracken Cty. P.L., Paducah, KY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Traveling encyclopedia/handbook territory already charted, Server adopts tone and approach in keeping with his unpretentious, entertaining subject matter. He includes more than 200 pulp fiction writers in various genres (e.g., adventure, detective, erotic, fantasy, horror, romance, science fiction, war, western) that he (the sole contributor) considers a "representative sampling," 19th century to the present. Police proceduralist Ed McBain, drug-culture icon William Burroughs, and horror master Stephen King are absent in favor of mysterious figures like Clare Winger Harris, who vanished following publication of her one collection of prize-winning science fiction stories (1947). From Asphalt Jungle to Z is for Zombie, creators of popular fiction are subjects of colorful entries, varying in length from 250 words to two to three double-columned pages. Entries sketch each writer's life and career and list major works (giving only titles and publication dates). Some entries list short stories, but not all. Server notes biographical tidbits that may have influenced writings; e.g., Jim Thompson was born in his sheriff father's jailhouse. Pseudonyms are indicated, with published titles listed under each name. Useful illustrations include a smiling Dashiell Hammett lounging in a chair whose upholstery carries a ghostly image that could be considered his dark, debauched alter ego. The scanty introduction supplies only a general overview of pulp fiction and its creators. Rival directories and companions (Contemporary Popular Writers, ed. by Dave Mote, CH, Jul'97; Doug Ellis et al.'s Adventure House Guide to the Pulps, 2000; and J. Randolph Cox's Dime Novel Companion, CH, Nov'00) provide more thorough coverage of pulp literature and writers. Additional information about these authors may be found in standard compilations like Contemporary Authors and Richard A. Lupoff's The Great American Paperback (2001), an illustrated overview of American popular fiction publishing. Server's Encyclopedia, engaging and accessible, will attract readers seeking basic information on pulp authors and writings. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers and undergraduates. J. A. Adams-Volpe SUNY at Buffalo


Excerpts

Excerpts

From the early days of dime novels to the contemporary mass-market paperbacks, pulp fiction is a vital part of popular culture. Encyclopedia of Pulp Fiction Writers is the first book to bring the scores of well-known and unsung heroes of pop literature into one volume. Encyclopedia of Pulp Fiction Writers covers the entire spectrum of pop literature's greatest entertainers and artists, the multimillion-copy bestsellers, and the inventors of the modern genres, such as the western, the hardboiled detective novel, the spy thriller, science fiction, horror, the legal thriller, crime fiction, and the erotic/romance novel. The book also profiles colorful but lesser-known underground figures, as well as a wide variety of talented paperback authors who were never given their due. Each of the 200 entries includes a brief biography along with a list of the author's writing credits. Authors covered include: V.C. Andrews Ray Bradbury Jackie Collins Lester Dent Ian Fleming Erle Stanley Gardner David Goodis Zane Grey Chester Himes Louis L'Amour H.P. Lovecraft Mario Puzo Jacqueline Susann and many more. Excerpted from Encyclopedia of Pulp Fiction Writers: The Essential Guide to More Than 200 Pulp Pioneers and Mass Market Masters by Lee Server All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.