Cover image for Islam and natural law
Title:
Islam and natural law
Author:
ʻIzzatī, Abū al-Faz̤l, 1932-
Publication Information:
London : ICAS, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
228 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781904063056
Format :
Book

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K460 .E98 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Aristotle, Kant, Marx, and Tabari are only a few of the many world thinkers whom Abul-Fazl Ezzati explores in his sweeping history and analysis of natural law. While this work distinguishes itself from other similar works by its detailed treatment of natural law in Islamic thought, it engages with both Islamic and Western discourse, with topics such as human rights, the inherent human nature, and rationality. The result is an insightful, all-encompassing treatment of human rights and the human beings physical, rational, emotional, and spiritual needs.


Table of Contents

Part I The Position of Natural Law and Human Rights in the West
The History of Natural Law Theory: Antiquity, Middle Ages and the Modern Period
Challenges to the Natural Law Theory
Part II The Position of Natural Law in Islam
Part III Fitrah, Human Primordial Nature
Part IV General Features and Major Principles of Islamic Rationality
Part V Islamic Rationality
Reason and Rationality in Islam
Islamic Rationality in the History of Islamic Thought
Appendix: A Case Study: a Comparative Study of the Concept of Human Rights UNUDHR and the Constitution of the IRI
Part I The Position of Natural Law and Human Rights in the West
The History of Natural Law Theory: Antiquity, Middle Ages and the Modern Period
Challenges to the Natural Law Theory
Part II The Position of Natural Law in Islam
Part III Fitrah, Human Primordial Nature
Part IV General Features and Major Principles of Islamic Rationality
Part V Islamic Rationality
Reason and Rationality in Islam
Islamic Rationality in the History of Islamic Thought
Appendix: A Case Study: a Comparative Study of the Concept of Human Rights UNUDHR and the Constitution of the IRI