Cover image for A geography of the Canadian economy
Title:
A geography of the Canadian economy
Author:
Wallace, Iain, 1946-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Don Mills, Ont. ; New York : Oxford University Press, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xiii, 265 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780195407730
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The geography of the Canadian economy is undergoing significant change. North-south links encouraged by the North American Free Trade Agreement are loosening east-west ties forged since Confederation. Metropolitian economies have replaced resource-based hinterlands as the centres of dynamicgrowth, and as the regional economies of traditional geographical units, such as the Praries, have become less homogeneous, policy choices have become more complex.In A Geography of the Canadian Economy, Wallace offers a detailed account of how geography has simultaneously shaped the evolution of Canada's economy and has been shaped by economic forces. It explores these themes along three dimensions. Part I, Context, reviews Canada's external economicrelations, globally and particularly within North America. Probing the implications of culture, politics, and regionalism for Canada's economic geography, it assesses the roles played by the natural environment, structural change in industrial systems, and the character of cities in shaping domesticeconomic opportunities and challenges.Part II, Sectors, presents an overview of Canada's major economic sectors, from the traditional, resource-based ones such as agriculture, forest products, and energy to those built on contemporary expertise in high-technology manufacturing and services. Part III, Regions, explores the distinctivecore/periphery economic structure of four major regions: Atlantic Canada, Central Canada, Western Canada, and Northern and Aboriginal Canada. A final chapter takes stock of the forces of continuity and change that make the geography of the Canadian economy a fascinating 'work in progress'.


Author Notes

Iain Wallace is at Carleton University.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Being neighbor to the largest and most dominant economy in the world has shaped Canada's economy. In addition and equally important for Canada are the fundamental changes taking place in the world; globalization and the expansion of economic treaties bring challenges that are perhaps unequal in historical terms. Wallace (Carleton Univ.) examines where Canada fits into the economic world system while providing an explanation of its domestic status. The book contains 15 chapters divided into three parts. The first part looks at Canada's role in the world context, discussing its external economic relations. The second part examines the country's economic sectors, from the traditional to the modern, e.g., agriculture, manufacturing, and transportation. The last part delves into Canada's major regional divisions, complementing the sectoral approach by recognizing that a specific economic sector differs from place to place. A brief concluding chapter summarizes and evaluates the economic and geographic realities of the country and succinctly looks to the future. The bibliography is extensive and important for further exploration. The book has a liberal number of helpful tables, figures, and well-designed and informative maps. Valuable not only for geographers but also for historians and economists. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. L. Yacher Southern Connecticut State University


Table of Contents

List of Tables
List of Figures
Acknowledgements
Preface
Part I Context
1 Canada and the World Economy
Introduction
Global Economic Restructuring and Its Implications for Canada
Canada and the Global Economy
Canadian Industrialization in a Continental Context
The Pattern of Canada's International Economic Linkages
Conclusion
Further Reading
2 The Role of Culture and Political Economy
Historical Introduction
The Political Economy of Regionalism: Background
The Era of 'Regional Policy' and Its Impact
Regional Political Economy at the Start of the Twenty-First Century
Society, Culture, and the Economy
Conclusion
Further Reading
3 The Natural Environment and the Economy
Introduction
Environmental Parameters
Staple Industries and the Environment
From Consumer Society to Conserver Society?
Climatic Change and Environmental Hazards
Conclusion
Further Reading
4 Structural Change in the Canadian Economy
Introduction
Globalization
Situating Canada in the Capitalist World Economy
National Competitive Advantage: Porter's Model
Economic Restructuring at the National Scale
The Region as a Key Economic Environment
Conclusion
Further Reading
5 Economic Dimensions of the Canadian Urban System
Introduction
Urban Systems
The Canadian Urban System
Metropolitian Concentration
Metropolitian Economies
Canada's Largest Metropolitian Regions
Strategies of Adjustment
Beyond the Metropolitian Areas
Conclusion
Further Reading
Part II Sectors
6 The Service Sector
Introduction
Distributive Services
Producer Services
Public, Non-market Services
Personal Services
Tourism
Conclusion
Further Reading
7 Post-Staples Manufacturing
Introduction
Manufacturing Overview
Canada's Place in the North American Auto Industry
The Aerospace Industry
Telecommunications, Computer Equipment, and Related Industries
Other High-Technology Sectors
Conclusion
Further Reading
8 Agriculture, Agri-food, and the Rural Economy
Introduction
Farm Characteristics
The Policy Framework
Regional Patterns
Beyond Agriculture
Conclusion
Further Reading
9 The Forest and Minerals Industries
Introduction
The Forest SectorThe Minerals Sector
Conclusion
Further Reading
10 The Energy and Chemical Industries
Introduction
The Geopolitics of Energy
Interfuel Competition and Industrial Location
Energy Projects as Means of National and Regional Development
Issues of the Early Twenty-First Century
Conclusion
Further Reading
11 Transportation
Introduction
The Role of Technological Change
Changes in Transportation Networks
Major Traffic Flows
Conclusion
Further Reading
Part III Regions
12 Atlantic Canada
Introduction
Regional Challenges
NewfoundlandNova Scotia
New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island
Conclusion
Further Reading
13 Central Canada
Introduction
Contrasts in the Core
Recent Economic Performance of Central Canada
Regional Economic Structure
Quebec Subregions
Ontario Subregions
Challenges of Economic Restructuring
Conclusion
Further Reading
14 Western Canada
Introduction
The Character of the Prairie Economy
The Character of the British Columbia Economy
Economic Restructuring in Western Canada
Regional Economy of the Western Provinces
Conclusion
Further Reading
15 Northern and Aboriginal Canada
Introduction
The Northern Economy
Conclusion
Further Reading
Conclusion: Continuity and Change
Glossary
References
Index