Cover image for Please, baby, please / by Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee ; illustrated by Kadir Nelson.
Title:
Please, baby, please / by Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee ; illustrated by Kadir Nelson.
Author:
Lee, Spike.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
A toddler's antics keep his mother busy as she tries to feed him, watch him on the playground, give him a bath, and put him to bed.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780689832338
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

From moments fussy to fond, Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Spike Lee and his wife, producer Tonya Lewis Lee, present a behind-the-scenes look at the chills, spills, and unequivocal thrills of bringing up baby!

Go back to bed,
baby, please, baby, please.
Not on your HEAD
baby baby baby, please!

Vivid illustrations from celebrated artist Kadir Nelson evoke toddlerhood from sandbox to high chair to crib, and families everywhere will delight in sharing these exuberant moments again and again.


Author Notes

Directing, writing, and starring in his own films, as did Charlie Chaplin and Orson Welles before him, Lee has arguably had almost as profound an influence on American filmmaking as his predecessors, although in very different ways. In his own words, he is good at "marketing," and what he has marketed is a highly politicized African American cinema that is also commercially viable. Many critics credit Lee with paving the way for a new wave of mass-market yet socially conscious filmmakers, including John Singleton, Charles Lane, and Carl Franklin.

The eldest of six children, Lee was educated first at Morehouse College and then at New York University's film school. His first feature release, She's Gotta Have It (1986), won the Prix de Jeunesse at Cannes and was both critically acclaimed and commercially successful in the United States. Lee went on to make School Daze (1988) and Do the Right Thing (1989), a technically sophisticated film that addressed racism in a complex and controversial fashion. The film constructs a narrative that leaves it to the viewer to decide whether its protagonist, Mookie, has done the right thing when he responds to the death of one of his friends at the hands of the police by throwing a trash can through the window of his employer, who had called the police in the first place. Because a riot ensues, many (white) critics argued that the film celebrated violence, and the press suggested that it would incite black spectators to riot (it did not). Other critics suggested that Mookie actually defuses a riot, by directing the community's anger toward property and away from the police.

Two years later, Lee tackled the subject of interracial relationships in another hotly debated film, Jungle Fever (1991), which some saw as preachy and sexist and others praised as bold and complex. However, his most recent and ambitious film, Malcolm X (1992), has been almost universally acclaimed.

Lee has published a companion text for each film that includes biographies of all of the principals, essays on such topics as guerilla filmmaking, production stills, details of salaries and finances, excerpts from his journal or production notes, and the script. These materials demystify production, advertise the talents of the people who work for him, and promote his political positions, particularly his commitment to black entrepreneurship and cultural self-expression.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

K^-Gr. 2. A weary mom implores her active toddler ("baby, please, baby, please") not to write on the wall, not to eat sand, tease, and more. This sweet, rhythmic picture book, by filmmaker Spike Lee and his wife, producer Tonya Lewis Lee, humorously portrays the age-old struggle between dynamo and disciplinarian. Mom and baby's day begins at 3 a.m., as we learn from the small clock that precedes the text on each spread: "Go back to bed, baby, please, baby, please." Hours later, the duo moves on to a breakfast of dry cereal at 8:45 ("Not on your HEAD, baby baby baby, please!") and toddles through a day of general glee, mischief, and foot-dragging. Nelson artfully captures the giddy exuberance of toddlerhood with close-up, kid's-eye perspectives on the diaper-clad heroine with her doe-brown eyes, tight-curled hair, luminous golden-brown skin . . . and serious spunk. Of course, at the end of the very long day, the baby settles into a gentler "Kiss me good night? Mama, Mama, Mama, please." Who could resist? --Karin Snelson


Publisher's Weekly Review

"Many grownups will recognize the title as the comic carnal plea uttered by Lee in his film, She's Gotta Have It. Now, Lee and his wife/co-author have turned those words into a G-rated parental entreaty-directed at an inexhaustible toddler," wrote PW. Ages 2-5. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-At 3:01 a.m., an exhausted parent begs a riled-up youngster to "Go back to bed, baby, please, baby, please." At a quarter to eight, the plea is for the child not to dump cereal on her head. Throughout the day, the toddler is asked to share a ball, eat some peas, and sleep tight. Baby is asked to not eat sand, be a tease, or splash. After being put to bed at 8:00 p.m., she comes into her parents' bedroom two hours later and asks, "Kiss me good night? Mama, Mama, Mama, please." The litany of pleas will strike a chord with parents and caregivers, and will amuse children with its repetition and rhyme. Bright, full-bleed illustrations evoke the child-centered mayhem of this frazzled yet loving family. Baby, with her caramel-colored skin and corkscrew curls, sometimes appears unnaturally proportioned, her head too large and her limbs contorted, but the overall effect is humorous and action-packed.-Anna DeWind Walls, Milwaukee Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.