Cover image for Snow bears
Title:
Snow bears
Author:
Waddell, Martin.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : Candlewick Press, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
When three little bears play in the snow, they pretend to be "snow bears" and their mother goes along with the game.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 290 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.4 0.5 62568.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 1 Quiz: 32449 Guided reading level: J.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780763619060
Format :
Book

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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Acclaimed storyteller Martin Waddell returns with a warm winter's tale of three little bears who love to pretend - and a Mommy Bear who loves to play along.

"But where are my baby bears?" Mommy Bear asked.
"I don't know where we are," said the biggest snow bear.

When Mommy Bear comes to look for her baby bears, she finds three snow bears instead. They don't look quite like her bears, but they do like to slide down the snowy slope and throw snowballs, just like her bears do. . . . Little readers will love being in on the charming snow bear game, illustrated by Sarah Fox-Davies with all the crisp beauty of a snowy day.


Author Notes

Martin Waddell was born April 10, 1941, in Belfast, Ireland. He always wanted to be a professional soccer player. After having played for junior teams in Ireland, he left school at fifteen and held a variety of jobs, including working at a publishing company and as a night switchboard operator for a taxi company.

Waddell is now one of the most prolific and successful contemporary children's writers, with more than one hundred books to his credit, some of them under his pseudonym Catherine Sefton.

He won the 1986 Other Award, for his book Starry Night, which was also a runner up for The Guardian Children¿s Fiction Award and was shortlisted for the Young Observer Teenage Fiction Prize. He has twice won the Smarties Book Prize, for Farmer Duck and Can't You Sleep Little Bear? He also won the 1989 Kurt Mascher Award for The Park In The Dark, the 1990 Bets Book For Babies for Rosie¿s Babies and has been shortlisted for the 1992 Smarties Book Prize for Along The Lonely Road.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 2. The author and the illustrator both indulge in a bit of feigned foolery in this cozy wintertime tale. A mother bear pretends not to recognize her three snow-covered cubs when she comes out to join their play, and they gleefully go along with the game. At last, at the littlest's request, the bears return home--not to a cave, but to a log cabin where they dry off before a fire and warm their bellies with toast. Waddell uses repetition to give the episode a comfortably predictable cast, and except for their slight smiles, the bears in snowy woodland scenes are drawn with shaggy, winning realism. Parental bears and their own little cubs will enjoy sharing this romp. --John Peters


Publisher's Weekly Review

What has happened to Mommy Bear's children? It seems that a trio of playful, snow-covered creatures has replaced them. While Mommy has fun sliding and "snowballing" with these snowy three, she can't help wondering aloud concerning the whereabouts of her offspring. But the responses are always strikingly similar: "I don't know where we are," answers the oldest snow bear. "I haven't seen us," says the middle snow bear. "We aren't here, Mommy Bear," replies the youngest. Once inside Mommy Bear's snuggly cabin, however, the snow melts to reveal Mommy's missing cubs. While Fox-Davies's (Bat Loves the Night) delicate watercolor-and-ink pictures capture the stillness of a world blanketed in snow, her sweet-natured characterizations make the ursine family appear rather inert in the invigorating chill, tempering the book's frisky theme. But Waddell's (Webster J. Duck) economic prose keeps the story from becoming overly warm-hearted, and his keen ear for child-sized absurdity will strike a chord of recognition with any reader who has succumbed to a snowfall's invitation to play. Ages 3-6. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Young children will easily associate with the pretend game that three little bears play. When their mother comes outside, the snow-covered cubs tell her that they are "snow bears," and she asks where her babies are. "I don't know where we are," says the biggest one. "We aren't here, Mummy Bear," says the littlest one. So, she frolics with them instead. Eventually, the smallest one gets cold and they all go inside for hot toast, where their covering melts and they reveal that they were just pretending. The story is slight and not particularly original, but youngsters are likely to enjoy the repeated refrain about not having seen Mummy's bears, and the very predictability of the text is reassuring. The color illustrations are pleasant, with large, realistically drawn bears, making the fact that they live in a house rather than in a cave seem somewhat incongruous. However, their activities work equally well for bears or preschoolers, and the large, fuzzy creatures on the snowy background are appealing. This title does not live up to the caliber of the author's Owl Babies or Can't You Sleep Little Bear (both Candlewick, 1992), but the target audience is likely to find it engaging.-Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.