Cover image for Storm cats
Title:
Storm cats
Author:
Doyle, Malachy.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2001.
Physical Description:
32 pages : chiefly color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
When they get trapped in a hole by a fallen tree during a raging storm, Miro and Ben, two neighborhood cats, are rescued by their owners, which results in the formation of new friendships!
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 64283.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689844645
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

A girl has a white cat. A boy has a black cat. They all live on the same street, but they've never met -- until one rainy night when a big storm results in bringing the cats and the children together in a most unexpected and delightful way.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Previously unacquainted neighbors become friends in this slight, rhyming fable. Although black cat Miro and white cat Ben live across the street from each other, it seems that never the twain-or their young owners, a boy and girl-shall meet. But after a huge storm, neither of the children can find their cats, and they unite in a search. They discover that Miro and Ben have sought refuge together in a storm sewer. Writes Doyle (Cow; Who Is Jesse Flood?): "Now Miro's had kittens,/ and Ben is the dad,/ and everyone's gathered together./ They've all come around,/ to admire the result.../ of the night of the terrible weather." British illustrator Trotter vividly dramatizes how the storm's fury terrifies the small animals. In one of the best pictures, the two cats look up from the bottom of the storm sewer as the glistening raindrops plummet down the dark hole. The story deflates considerably after the tempest-Trotter's straight-on perspectives and literal interpretations add no oomph to the increasingly pallid rhymes. Nonetheless, readers should find the central idea rings true: when it comes to community-building, proximity sometimes needs a nudge from serendipity. Ages 3-7. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-In this quirky rhyming tale, two cats, two kids, and one storm equals kittens and a friendship. The girl has Ben and the boy has Miro. The white and black cats live on opposite sides of the street, as do their owners, and "no, never once" did any of them meet until the storm. With a minimum of distress, the creatures escape the weather by jumping down a manhole but they are trapped when a tree falls over it. A search brings the youngsters together to rescue their pets. Later, Miro produces four kittens-one black, one white, two mixed. This soothing tale for stormy nights or when pets are lost lacks the crackle hinted at in its cover illustration, and throughout the night the "two frightened cats" appear only mildly perplexed. Trotter's pencil-and-watercolor illustrations pleasingly support the text and several mice lurk in the spreads to reward observant children. Though the felines fare better than the kids in the pictures, the cartoon simplicity is acceptable for this wee slice of life. A reassuring tale of a budding friendship with a four-kitten conclusion.-Jody McCoy, The Bush School, Seattle, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.