Cover image for Can you find it?
Title:
Can you find it?
Author:
Cressy, Judith.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art : H.N. Abrams, 2002.
Physical Description:
40 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
Presents a diverse collection of well-known paintings which show how, through the centuries, artists have hidden small details to be discovered by curious eyes.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781588390530

9780810932791
Format :
Book

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In Can You Find It, Too? children approach art as detectives, browsing through 20 beautifully reproduced paintings in search of more than 150 details that are fun to find. With works from renowned institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and featuring art by renowned artists from all over the world, the search is on-for a musical horse, a nest of baby birds, even an artist's signature in worms!


Summary

Hidden away in each of the paintings that make up this children's book are a number of features. Whether the reader is searching for a set of pink shoes or a chair in the air this is a terrific way to learn to appreciate art.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-5. Like its predecessor, Can You Find It? 0 (2003), Cressy's newest book, published in conjunction with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, engages young readers in masterpieces of world painting through art-based "I spy" puzzlers. Its view is richer and deeper than that of its companion book, drawing as it does from 10 other collections besides that of the Metropolitan Museum. But the format is the same: each of the 20 featured paintings, mostly Renaissance European but representing a smattering of other cultures and eras, appears alongside a list of items to be found in the scene. Annotated keys appear at book's end in case young ones get stuck--a likely outcome considering the minutiae involved and the sometimes awkward positioning of important details (as when one of four baby carriages of L. S. Lowry's July, the Seaside0 disappears into the binding). Nonetheless, it's hard to fault a book that encourages young readers to pore over every square centimeter of such works as Bruegel the Elder's rambunctious Children at Play 0 and to discover for themselves that "the fun is in the looking." --Jennifer Mattson Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

A companion to the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Can You Find It? is Can You Find It, Too?: Search and Discover More Than 150 Details in 20 Works of Art by Judith Cressy, which encourages readers to examine closely some famed artwork from across the centuries to discover a variety of items. Kids peruse works from Horemhab Offering Wine to Anubis, by an unknown artist circa 1323-1295 B.C., to The Haywain or Path of Life by Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516) of the Netherlands. The museum home of each can be found in the back, along with a brief analysis of the piece. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-In Cressy's sequel to Can You Find It? (Abrams, 2002), details of paintings from the Metropolitan Museum's collection are present, but the author has branched out here to include artwork from three other American museums as well as works from seven European collections. This expansion enriches and enlivens the book and the enjoyable task of finding details within each piece. Each spread features a three-quarter-page picture and a list of several things to look for. Cressy notes how studying a piece to find people, animals, and objects inevitably allows children to look at art closely and carefully. This exposure to international masterpieces representing different cultures and histories throughout the centuries is bound to make an impression on children. The paintings are stunning, and reproduced with attention to light and shadow; their diversity introduces readers to a wide variety of styles and subjects. Answers to the challenges are provided at the end of the book, along with information on each artist, the work itself, and where it resides. This is art as entertainment with an educational bent as well, but, most of all, it is thoroughly engaging.-Tracy Karbel, Glenside Public Library District, Glendale Heights, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

Gr. 2^-5. The author of What Can You Do with a Paper Bag? (2001) invites graduates of Lucy Micklethwait's simpler "I spy" art series to play seek-and-find with works of art from the Metropolitan Museum's collections. The selections include landscapes, crowd scenes, and portraits from a wide range of eras and artistic traditions; each comes with a list of eight details or items to pick out. A closing key both pinpoints the items and supplies brief additional information about the works and their artists. Viewers will have to be very sharp to spot some of the tinier figures in a folk artist's view of an entire town, or in Pannini's depiction of a riotously overstocked eighteenth-century art gallery; and Tiepolo's Dance in the Country needs a better reproduction before anyone is going to spot "5 blue bows" on its figures. Still, along with deriving pleasure from solving the puzzles, children who pore over the pictures may be willing to give art encountered later more than cursory glances. --John Peters


Publisher's Weekly Review

Paintings from the Metropolitan Museum of Art undergo scrutiny in Can You Find It? by Judith Cressy. The text prompts onlookers to investigate 19 paintings that each stretch across a spread and are abutted by vertical panels with color-coded lists of more than 150 items to locate. Peter Saul's View of San Francisco, Number 2, for example, challenges children to find "6 ships/ 3 palm trees/ 3 bridges/ 1 wiggly road/ 1 tunnel/ 3 pagodas/ 1 doughnut-shaped building/ & the number 76 twice." Back matter provides the answers and further information about each artist. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-Nineteen paintings from New York City's Metropolitan Museum of Art were chosen for careful scrutiny in this book. Next to each striking, full-color reproduction is a list of items to search for: e.g., "2 cats, 6 lotus blossoms, 3 eye amulets," etc., for a painting from ancient Egypt. The works of art are from around the globe and range from illuminated manuscripts to 20th-century canvases. Designed to encourage discovery, the tiny, sometimes indistinct details will keep children engrossed for hours. Fortunately, an answer key is appended. Every part of the book is utilized, including the title page and back cover. For an older audience than Lucy Micklethwait's "I Spy" series (Greenwillow), this lovely volume will be a popular and entertaining addition.-Robin L. Gibson, Perry County District Library, New Lexington, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.