Cover image for Waifs and strays
Title:
Waifs and strays
Author:
De Lint, Charles, 1951-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Viking, [2002]
Physical Description:
xviii, 394 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
Chiefly a collection of previously published (1986-2001) stories.
Language:
English
Contents:
Merlin dreams in the Moondream Wood -- There's no such thing -- Sisters -- Fairy dust -- A wish named Arnold -- Wooden bones -- The graceless child -- A tattoo on her heart -- Stick -- May this be your last sorrow -- One Chance -- Alone -- But for the grace go I -- Ghosts of wind and shadow -- Waifs and strays -- Somewhere in my mind there is a painting box.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 5.6 16.0 65229.
ISBN:
9780670035847
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Charles de Lint's remarkable novels and shorter fiction are, in a very real sense, coming of age stories. Here, for the first time, is a collection of his stories about teenagers collection for teen and adult readers alike. From the streets of his famed Newford to the alleys of Bordertown to the realms of Faerie, this is storytelling that will transfix and delight, with characters who will linger in the mind of them from his novels. Featuring an illuminating preface by acclaimed author, anthologist, and critic Terri Windling, Waifs and Strays is a must-own for de Lint fans, and an ideal introduction to his work for newcomers.


Author Notes

Charles de Lint, an extraordinarily prolific writer of fantasy works, was born in the Netherlands in 1951. Due to his father's work as a surveyor, the family lived in many different places, including Canada, Turkey, and Lebanon. De Lint was influenced by many writers in the areas of mythology, folklore, and science fiction.

De Lint originally wanted to play Celtic music. He only began to write seriously to provide an artist friend with stories to illustrate. The combination of the success of his work, The Fane of the Grey Rose (which he later developed into the novel The Harp of the Grey Rose), the loss of his job in a record store, and the support of his wife, Mary Ann, helped encourage de Lint to pursue writing fulltime. After selling three novels in one year, his career soared and he has become a most successful fantasy writer.

De Lint's works include novels, novellas, short stories, chapbooks, and verse. He also publishes under the pseudonyms Wendelessen, Henri Cuiscard, and Jan Penalurick. He has received many awards, including the 2000 World Fantasy Award for Best Collection for Moonlight and Vines, the Ontario Library Association's White Pine Award, as well as the Great Lakes Great Books Award for his young adult novel The Blue Girl. His novel Widdershins won first place, Amazon.com Editors' Picks: Top 10 Science Fiction & Fantasy Books of 2006. In 1988 he won Canadian SF/Fantasy Award, the Casper, now known as the Aurora for his novel Jack, the Giant Killer. Also, de Lint has been a judge for the Nebula Award, the World Fantasy Award, the Theodore Sturgeon Award and the Bram Stoker Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 7-12. Whether set in Ottawa, Bordertown, or the made-up city of Newton somewhere in North America, de Lint's 16 stories evoke a sense of magic just beyond the ordinary world. His well-drawn characters are mostly outsiders whose lives are touched and changed by that often-elusive magic. In choosing the stories, de Lint went through all his short fiction, setting aside tales with teen protagonists. The only original piece here is «Sisters,» a sequel to a story about teenage vampires that is also included in the collection. The other selections have been previously published in magazines or anthologies; one recently appeared in a slightly different form in The Green Man: Tales from the Mythic Forest, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. A showcase for the diversity of a popular fantasy writer, this will draw de Lint's fans and also serve as a good introduction to his work. Sally Estes.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Urban teens take center stage in a pair of edgy short story collections. Waifs and Strays presents 15 previously published works by Canadian fantasy writer Charles de Lint, including "May This Be Your Last Sorrow" from The Essential Bordertown and "There's No Such Thing," which appeared in Yolen and Greenburg's anthology Vampires. In its first appearance, "Sisters," tells of precocious 16-year-old Appoline, a vampire ("Yeah, I drink blood. But it's not as gross as it sounds. And it's not as messy as it is in some of the movies") who plans to wait until her sister, Cassandra, turns 16 before turning her into one, too. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-Mythic fiction is at its best in this anthology of stories of memorable heroines, rooted not in a secondary world but in an urban environment. The author introduces each selection, providing insight and interesting biographical information. The subject of two stories is a 16-year-old vampire named Apples who receives "the Gift" from a stranger during a Bryan Adams concert. She hopes to "turn" her sister Cassie when she is older, if she agrees, so they can live together forever. Poking fun at the television version of a teenage vampire, the heroine offers a more pragmatic view of her lot in life as she avenges evil doings in her neighborhood. In the section "Bordertown," where magic and reality coexist, an elf named Manda saves the life of a Harley-riding black man who is the neighborhood peacekeeper in a city rife with prejudice and violence. Elements of Robin Hood, Merlin, Native American mythology, and Celtic music weave through each story. Some of the heroines are humans who briefly tiptoe into a magical realm or are skeptical about its existence. De Lint's characters are often lonely and intelligent misfits whose self-discovery triumphs over plot. Described as "urban fantasy," these stories represent a hybrid genre for readers who only want one arm through the door into another world.-Vicki Reutter, Cazenovia High School, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Terri Windling
The Mythic World of Charles de Lintp. xi
Author's Notep. xv
Tamson Housep. 1
Merlin Dreams in the Mondream Woodp. 3
Ottawa and the Valleyp. 21
There's No Such Thingp. 23
Sistersp. 32
Fairy Dustp. 73
A Wish Named Arnoldp. 83
Wooden Bonesp. 93
Otherworlds: Past and Futurep. 109
The Graceless Childp. 111
A Tattoo on Her Heartp. 139
Bordertownp. 151
Stickp. 154
May This Be Your Last Sorrowp. 209
Newford: In and Out of the Cityp. 217
One Chancep. 220
Alonep. 233
But for the Grace Go Ip. 250
Ghosts of Wind and Shadowp. 272
Waifs and Straysp. 313
Somewhere in My Mind There Is a Painting Boxp. 355
About the Authorp. 393