Cover image for The boys start the war
Title:
The boys start the war
Author:
Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds.
Personal Author:
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Waterville, ME : Thorndike Press, 2002.

©1993
Physical Description:
160 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
Disgusted that a family with three girls moves into the house across the river, nine-year-old Wally and his three brothers declare a practical joke war on the girls.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.6 4.0 10248.
ISBN:
9780786246519
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Disgusted that a family with three girls moves into the house across the river, nine-year-old Wally and his three brothers declare a practical joke war on the girls.


Author Notes

Phyllis Reynolds Naylor was born in Anderson, Indiana on January 4, 1933. She received a bachelor's degree from American University in 1963. Her first children's book, The Galloping Goat and Other Stories, was published in 1965. She has written more than 135 children and young adult books including Witch's Sister, The Witch Returns, The Bodies in the Bessledorf Hotel, A String of Chances, The Keeper, Walker's Crossing, Bernie Magruder and the Bats in the Belfry, Please Do Feed the Bears, and The Agony of Alice, which was the first book in the Alice series. She has received several awards including the Edgar Allan Poe Award for Night Cry and the Newberry Award for Shiloh.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 3-5. The slapstick, mischief, and trickery in this good-humored story about getting your own back will keep middle grade readers laughing. Furious that the kids in the new family across the river are all girls, the Hartford brothers start a campaign to drive the Malloys out of their West Virginia town. What the boys don't realize is that the girls can give as good as they get. The reversals are both wild and banal: the girls' tricks range from stealing jockey shorts off the line to pretending to be dead; the boys have a great time with Halloween-type monster disguises and with catching the girls in embarrassing moments. The story is told from the point of view of the fourth-grader in each family. They can't help admiring each other's tricks; they even wonder--momentarily--if it might be fun to be friends. Unlike Naylor's books about Alice, the embarrassment here isn't mixed with anguish. Shame is just a spur for gleeful revenge. And they do get revenge. Both sides. Again and again. ~--Hazel Rochman