Cover image for Thou shall prosper : ten commandments for making money
Title:
Thou shall prosper : ten commandments for making money
Author:
Lapin, Daniel (Daniel E.)
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
vi, 362 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Electronic Access:
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/wiley023/2002008986.html
ISBN:
9780471218685
Format :
Book

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BM538.W4 L37 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Praise for THOU SHALL PROSPER

"Rabbi Daniel Lapin's wisdom has helped untold numbers of people, including me, grow in our business, family, and spiritual lives. In Thou Shall Prosper, Rabbi Lapin has done it again. This book tells it like it is in a helpful, honest, hopeful, informative way. He offers valid, useful information based on ancient wisdom and modern experience."
-Zig Ziglar, author and motivational teacher

"Is it practical to apply spiritual lessons to the hardheaded world of business? In this potentially life-changing book, Rabbi Daniel Lapin proves that it's impractical not to use those lessons-and to bring ancient, timeless wisdom to contemporary problems. This unique approach provides an organized, supremely useful view of the world, combining common sense and unexpected, even startling insight. No matter how successful or sophisticated you may be, this remarkable work will enrich your understanding of the important, exciting process of building wealth."
-Michael Medved, nationally syndicated radio host and author of Hollywood vs. America

"Rabbi Daniel Lapin is a light unto the nations. A risk-taking rabbi of immense wisdom, his books have already influenced countless Jews and non-Jews with the eternal truths of the Hebrew Bible. Now, in this highly insightful and controversial new book, Rabbi Lapin unearths the golden nuggets of Jewish business genius. By emphasizing the unique talents of the Jewish way of life, Rabbi Lapin demonstrates how Judaism's spiritual regimen can be translated into tangible material rewards, with the bottom line being directly affected. A thoroughly engaging, enriching, and thought-provoking book."
-Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, author of Kosher Sex and Judaism for Everyone

"Rabbi Lapin is an unorthodox Orthodox rabbi. He understands the Biblical nature of economic freedom as well as he understands the Bible: uniquely well. Prosperity must have a purpose and Rabbi Lapin explores the wellsprings of the Judeo-Christian heritage to elucidate those purposes. In so doing, he also illuminates the road to greater prosperity for all. I really enjoyed this book and I heartily recommend it to people of all faiths."
-The Honorable Jack Kemp


Author Notes

Rabbi Daniel Lapin is a nationally known speaker, advisor to President George W. Bush, and a syndicated radio talk-show host


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Combining pop psychology, snippets of Jewish lore, homespun homilies and quotations from a daunting variety of sources, Lapin offers a manual on how to make money by succeeding in business. Lapin, a super-conservative Orthodox rabbi and talk show host, insists that everyone is in business "unless you are a Supreme Court judge [sic] or a tenured university professor." (Excluding professors fits with Lapin's devaluation of them, since he believes that higher education doesn't prepare for "real life.") The material is organized into 10 chapters of advice, beginning with the notion that "business is moral, noble and worthy," and ending with the admonition not to retire. Throughout, Lapin urges behavior that will produce more business and, thus, more money. For example, he unabashedly recommends attending synagogue or church services in order to make business contacts. Similarly, he encourages giving charity to an organization that has members who "are in the best position to advance your business objectives." Lapin justifies these dubious actions by interpreting the fifth commandment ("Honor thy father and thy mother") as a mandate to form relationships for business purposes. His struggle to ground his financial advice in Jewish tradition is abandoned as he expounds an anti-environmentalist stance. He digresses still further from both Judaism and wealth-building when he gives tips for public speaking based on what his father taught him (talking without a manuscript or notes and not grasping the rostrum). Lapin's book may appeal to patient readers who share his conservative political and economic views. (Oct. 11) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 1
The First Commandment: Believe in the Dignity and Morality of Businessp. 17
The Second Commandment: Extend the Network of Your Connectedness to Many Peoplep. 55
The Third Commandment: Get to Know Yourselfp. 89
The Fourth Commandment: Do Not Pursue Perfectionp. 127
The Fifth Commandment: Lead Consistently and Constantlyp. 167
The Sixth Commandment: Constantly Change the Changeable, While Steadfastly Clinging to the Unchangeablep. 201
The Seventh Commandment: Learn to Foretell the Futurep. 235
The Eighth Commandment: Know Your Moneyp. 265
The Ninth Commandment: Act Rich: Give Away 10 Percent of Your After-Tax Incomep. 293
The Tenth Commandment: Never Retirep. 315
Epiloguep. 337
Notesp. 341
Indexp. 351