Cover image for Clarence the copy cat
Title:
Clarence the copy cat
Author:
Lakin, Pat.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Doubleday Book for Young Readers, 2002.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Clarence, a cat who does not want to hurt mice or any other creatures, does not feel welcome anywhere until he discovers the Barnstable Library.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
380 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.9 0.5 67402.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.9 3 Quiz: 34586 Guided reading level: K.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780385327473
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Clarence has finally found a home in the town library, but will he be ousted when the librarian discovers his uselessness as a mouser? Clarence may be a cat, but he's a peace-loving cat--definitely not a mouser. This gets him evicted from his parents' home at Sam's Sandwich Shop. Sadly, other storekeepers shoo him away too, as soon as a dreaded m-o-u-s-e appears. Poor Clarence just can't find a place without mice. Dejected and tired, Clarence is feeling very sorry for himself when a kindly librarian takes him in. Clarence's new home is grand--a public library filled with books. There's even a whirring copy machine! Clarence loves to sit on top of it, earning him the name Copy Cat. For months, life is good. Very good . . . until the winter day when a you-know-what shows up. . . .


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS^-Gr. 2. Clarence is a nonviolent cat, which makes him tremendously unpopular with the clientele at Sam's Sandwich Shop after a mouse appears and Clarence refuses to lift a paw to catch it. Clarence is banished from the deli and, in a wonderful double-page spread, he's shown being similarly ejected from other shops for sticking to his principles. He finally finds a home in the library, where the copy machine becomes his favorite spot. Grandfatherly Mr. Spanner calls him Copy Cat. Then a mouse shows up, throwing a children's reading group into chaos, and Clarence is expected to do something about it. The attempts Clarence makes to get rid of the mouse without hurting it are both heroic and hysterical, and Manders' cartoon-style art catches all the action as the critters make a whirlwind of books, brooms, and paper. A well-plotted, action-packed, comically illustrated story. Connie Fletcher


Publisher's Weekly Review

At the start of Lakin's (Don't Forget) appealing story, Clarence, a pacifist cat, gets evicted from Sam's deli: "Clarence stuck to his principles. He would not hurt mice." When he finally finds a new home at the library and the inevitable mouse arrives, Clarence eats the mousetrap cheese and builds barricades of books to keep the mouse at bay. Nothing works until Clarence leaps to save the mouse from the broom-wielding librarian, lands with a "big fat belly flop right on the copy machine glass," and photocopies of Clarence's terrified face scare the mouse away. Like sketchy caricatures, Manders's (First-Base Hero) action sequences and characters seem ready-made for animation, and when the spindly-legged Clarence sees the photocopy of himself as "a huge black cat with bulging legs, an enormous tummy, and whiskers that stuck out like arrows," the visual joke has wry resonance. While the library pictured in the book (patterned after a branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh) is curiously bland (title-less books of a uniform color fill the shelves), book lovers will find the picture of Clarence and the librarian nestled together in a comfy window seat a satisfying parting view. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Clarence is supposed to help catch the mice in the deli in which he lives with his parents. However, since he can't "bear to harm another living creature," he is banished from the store. He tries to find a home elsewhere, but is thrown out when the owners discover that he is no mouser. The feline slinks sadly down the street and wonders if he will ever find a home. He finally curls up by the door of the local library, where the librarian takes pity on him and invites him in. Clarence loves it there because he is kept "well read, well fed, and well petted," but especially because there are no mice. He sits on top of the copy machine so often that Mr. Spanner calls him Copy Cat. Then, one winter day a mouse shows up for storytime. Readers will sympathize with poor Clarence and root for him as he battles with the rodent and finds a solution to his problem. Manders's appealing, full-color illustrations are lively and full of fun. Tall and skinny Clarence has a black coat and bulging yellow eyes, and is particularly comical when he stuffs his face with cheese or sits primly on the copier. Children will laugh out loud as they follow his adventures.-Kristin de Lacoste, South Regional Public Library, Pembroke Pines, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.