Cover image for The encyclopedia of blindness and vision impairment
Title:
The encyclopedia of blindness and vision impairment
Author:
Sardegna, Jill.
Edition:
Second edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Facts on File, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xiii, 333 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
General Note:
First ed. cataloged under the m.e.: Sardegna, Jill.
Language:
English
Added Author:
Electronic Access:
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/fy032/2001055653.html
ISBN:
9780816042807
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Millions of Americans have a significant level of vision impairment. This revised edition of The Encyclopedia of Blindness and Vision Impairment is designed to provide students, professionals, and general readers with a comprehensive source of practical information on what has become the second most common disability in the United States. More than 500 detailed entries are written in clear, concise language with a minimum of technical jargon. The volume incorporates a history of blindness and vision impairment with an A-to-Z presentation of health issues, types of surgery, medications, medical terminology, social issues, myths and misconceptions, economic issues, and current research trends. This volume also features updated statistics on blindness and vision impairment, as well as new and updated appendixes offering information on schools for the blind, relevant web sites for further study, and much more. Revised and updated, the second edition features new and expanded entries on: Refractive eye surgery; Cataract surgery; Glaucoma treatment and research; Macular degeneration research.


Author Notes

Jill Sardegna is a freelance writer In addition, she was an exhibit developer for the children's Discovery Museum of San Jose, where she created the traveling hands-on exhibit One Way or Another, designed to teach children about disabilities
Susan Shelly holds a B.A. in English and has 20 years' experience as a reporter, writer, and editor. She was a reporter and columnist for the Reading Eagle/Times for nine years and has written for various agencies, publications, and an on-line news service
Allan Richard Rutzen, M.D., holds a B.S. with honors from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, and an M.D. with distinction from Cornell University Medical College in New York City. He is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
Scott M. Steidl, M.D., D.M.A., holds a ScB. in biochemistry and an A.B. in music from Brown University, an M.M.A. and a D.M.A. from the Juilliard School, and an M.D. from The Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He is currently an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Updating the 1991 edition, the more than 500 entries in this resource address a range of issues related to vision impairment and vision loss. Arranged alphabetically, topics include key people, aid devices, diseases, medical procedures, legislation, social issues, and companies and organizations. Although the book is intended for the general public, undergraduate and high-school students should find articles discussing issues such as Employment disincentives or Myths about blindness useful for research papers and speeches. Article length averages half a page. The second edition contains several new topics, 100 updated entries, and 11 completely redone appendixes. For example, readers can now find information about guide horses, LASIK surgery, and the possible damaging effects of air bags. Selected articles include contact information or a short bibliography. Many bibliographies have been updated to include Web page addresses while retaining print resources dating from the 1980s. Appendixes provide contact information for dog-guide schools, national organizations, and other useful resources. Most entries listed in the appendixes include Web page addresses. However, none of the 36 federal agencies listed in appendix 4 contain a Web page address. In some cases, cross-referencing appears incomplete. Of four diseases mentioned in Cataract, only one is cross-referenced although all four have their own entries. Like the previous edition, this new publication contains one illustration, a labeled drawing of the eye. Although the authors explain topics using precise and easy-to-understand terminology, the lack of charts, drawings, and pictures, in some cases, slows comprehension. Some of the information in this resource can be found in other sources. For example, readers can find a description of cataracts in the Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine (2d ed., Gale, 2002), or find periodical articles on eye damage caused by air bags. However, its coverage and convenience make The Encyclopedia of Blindness and Vision Impairment unique. Those with the older edition will want to update. Suitable for academic and public libraries.


Choice Review

This alphabetical compendium has more than 500 entries on blindness and related issues, including legal questions, companies specializing in products for the blind, and drugs commonly used to treat eye diseases. Although many entries include brief bibliographies, many have not been updated since the first edition (CH, Sep'91). Addresses and Web sites are provided for companies and organizations. Problems noted in the first edition have not been corrected: no cross-references lead from the popular terminology "farsightedness" or "nearsightedness" to the scientific names and articles for those conditions, nor are there cross-references between the articles on specific dog-guide organizations and the articles "Dog Guides" or "Dog Guide Laws." Numerous appendixes complete the book, e.g., lists of dog-guide schools, schools for the blind, organizations, higher-education scholarships, but there are no lists of regional or state libraries for the blind. Current addresses and phone numbers for agencies and organizations may justify purchase of this edition, but the content does not appear significantly updated from the first edition. K. Bradley Bellevue Community College


Excerpts

Excerpts

Millions of Americans have a significant level of vision impairment. This revised edition of The Encyclopedia of Blindness and Vision Impairment is designed to provide students, professionals, and general readers with a comprehensive source of practical information on what has become the second most common disability in the United States. More than 500 detailed entries are written in clear, concise language with a minimum of technical jargon. The volume incorporates a history of blindness and vision impairment with an A-to-Z presentation of health issues, types of surgery, medications, medical terminology, social issues, myths and misconceptions, economic issues, and current research trends. This volume also features updated statistics on blindness and vision impairment, as well as new and updated appendixes offering information on schools for the blind, relevant web sites for further study, and much more. Revised and updated, the second edition features new and expanded entries on: Refractive eye surgery Cataract surgery Glaucoma treatment and research Macular degeneration research. Excerpted from The Encyclopedia of Blindness and Vision Impairment by Jill Sardegna, Susan Shelly, Allan Rutzen, Scott M. Steidl All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Preface to the First Editionp. ix
Preface to the Second Editionp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Entries A-Zp. 1
Appendixesp. 271
Bibliographyp. 311
Indexp. 325