Cover image for Videodrome
Title:
Videodrome
Author:
Cronenberg, David, 1943-
Edition:
[DVD version].
Publication Information:
Universal City, CA : Universal Home Video, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (87 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Cable TV programmer Max Renn seeks out the ultimate in bizarre shows for his channel. He meets a mysterious supplier named Harlan who gives him access to an underground sex and violence network called "Videodrome."
General Note:
Widescreen format (aspect ratio: 1.85:1).

Originally released as a motion picture in 1982.

"Complete uncut version including footage never shown in movie theatres"--Container.

For specific features see interactive menu.
Language:
English

French

Spanish
Reading Level:
Not rated.
ISBN:
9780783228457
UPC:
025192038723
Format :
DVD

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DVD 4148 Adult DVD Open Shelf
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DVD 4148 Adult DVD Central Library
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DVD 4148 Adult DVD Audio Visual
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DVD 4148 Adult DVD Audio Visual
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Summary

Summary

A sleazy TV producer who becomes obsessed with a mysterious show called Videodrome. Featuring sadomasochistic violence, the show has the power to induce freakish hallucinations in its viewers.


Summary

Hardcore pornography, sadomasochism, mind control, and living televisions all play crucial roles in Videodrome, one of director David Cronenberg's explorations of dangerous sexuality and technological obsession. The morally questionable hero of the tale is one Max Renn (James Woods), a television executive searching for an intense new program for his sex-oriented network. He ultimately discovers an underground program called "Videodrome," which appears to broadcast pornographic snuff films of actual murders. Horrified but perversely intrigued, Renn sets out to find the truth behind the program. During his search, he meets alluring femme fatale Nicki (Blondie lead singer Debbie Harry), technology cult leader Bianca O'Blivion, and other mysterious figures. Things become even more disturbing for Renn as his addiction grows, and the program begins to infect the outside world -- or perhaps merely destroy own his sanity. Cronenberg mingles his cerebral concerns about the nature of reality in the video age with enough visceral gore (courtesy of Rick Baker) to satisfy the film's intended horror audience. ~ Judd Blaise, Rovi